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Thread: How does a Lake get on the MNR stocking list

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    Default How does a Lake get on the MNR stocking list

    I was wondering how a lake gets selected by the MNR for fishing stocking? Does anybody know or has anyone been involved in this?
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

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    Thats a good question. Im assuming they test water quality and suitable fish habitat and food sources before dumping money into a lake.

    Other than that, your guess is as good as mine.

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    Going waaay back in time, locals could approach the old L&F and request fish for planting into known local lakes. This worked to some extent but as time went on it became necessary for a bit more control over what was actually taking place.
    In the mid 50's and up to the 80' and '90's CO's duties comprised of a mix of management and enforcement. They were expected to develop a fair knowledge of their patrol areas and manage that area accordingly. If a particular piece of water showed potential for a viable fishery then they could recommend to the district fisheries bio to have a lake survey done. Over time most of the obvious lakes and rivers developed a history that included fish species present, the angling pressure and its productivity.
    If it was determined that a water body required some management enhancement then the best solution was applied. In the 50's, 60's and 70's when fisheries management was really still in its infancy the usual solution was supplemental planting or introduction of a suitable species. Determining factors could include water chemistry, public access and angling pressure or demand.
    In recent years fisheries science has developed even further so management of a particular water body has become more intricate. So, whether a lake is planted or not nowadays would involve its known history, its current productivity level, the angling pressure and overall demand by the public.

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    i heard that it depended if that fish species was native to that body of water

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    Thats only one aspect of an overall management strategy. Many smaller water bodies have no species present but if it has ideal water chemistry it may be suitable for introductions of specks, splake or rainbow.

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    if you check the stocking lists you will see some of the lakes stocked are ( what I call put and take lakes ) the MNR put them in for the anglers to take out, especially with splake that do not reproduce, our lake was stocked with walleye fingerlings for about 5 years and I am pretty sure our lake association had some input on it but walleye had been in the lake before, I have only caught and released 1 that did not have it's fin clipped ( about 12" long ) and when contacting the MNR about this they thought it could have been one that was missed getting it's fin clipped. I go down to the dock almost every night I am there checking to see if I can spot any small walleye swimming around but no luck so far. GW, if you think you have a spot like this , find out if the lake has an association and go from there....

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    I know some of the things they require, a minimum depth of 15' so it doesn't freeze to the bottom, this number could have changed. A rough topo of the lake, can be done with a fish finder. Water analysis. Nothing very secret or difficult. Just approach the MNR with your request and they will give you the info you are required to gather. It has been years since we added any new lakes in this area, so sorry I can't give you a better answer.
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    This is typically initiated through local/cottagers speaking with MNR officials. Subsequently the MNR through there many netting protocols will look at fish populations and fish communities present. (With the current Broadscale netting the intention is to net each lake in a 5 year rotation to assess short term change in both population and structure).

    Biologist will meet to discuss species specific targets and management strategies on a regional level. They must consider if they want to create a put-grow-take lake, or are they stocking to help replenish breeding stock after a number of low productivity years and weak cohorts. If stocking is considered as a management strategy for the area and it was determined that a given lake could sustain the fish, there are two options. They could produce the fish from MNR brood stock in hatcheries, or as provincial funding can often be restrictive, they will often cooperate with local fish and game clubs in private volunteer run hatcheries. If using wild stock, the MNR or OFAH will come out and help with the technical part of the fish egg and milt collection. From that point forward the hatchery is run by the volunteers and when fish reach the desired release size, the MNR comes with their stocking trailer/boat and helps with the release of fish. I should have also mentioned, that in “most” cases there must be some public access to publically funded stocked lakes, either a boat ramp or winter access.

    I have been involved in fish stocking/egg collections and hatchery work across the province in a number of capacities. It’s unfortunate that the province does not have more funding for this, but from a positive perspective, getting the community involved in work like this provides a sense of ownership and has resulted in regular shoreline clean ups and bbq fundraisers and people respecting their catch more.
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    Thanks everyone very good information.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

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    The days of dumping them in and hoping for the best are pretty well gone, at least in our area. A few walleye get stocked some years but in Bancroft trout are king. If a lake has no natural reproduction the chances are that splake or rainbow, depending on the lake characteristics, will be the species stocked.
    There has been some changes in our stocking lists over the past decade as new biologists have come on line in our area and more lakes are being surveyed (or re-surveyed). Some lakes that have had a winter oxygen shortage or not enough natural food have been dropped. The Northern Studies classes at the high school have also been a big help with the surveys and stocking programs, not to mention the community hatchery as well.
    The LT from this hatchery are going into lakes that have this strain of trout already in them, as opposed to the lakes that have been stocked by the MNR with LT from their hatcheries. (they have done DNA testing to be certain of this)

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