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Thread: reloading brass

  1. #11
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    thanks for the info guys oilman

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    Default Re- loading brass

    Try seating your bullets .20 thousands of an inch off your rifle lands and reduce your powder charge by 4grains. You will notice improved accuracy,less bullet jump from throat to barrel,gets onto the rifling quicker. How ever do not attempt to seat the bullet tight to the lands. This will create extreme chamber pressure resulting in gun and personal injury!

    Most factory loads are way short of the lands,generally for hunting applications. Precise shooting needs this type of accurate re- loading. Remember re-loading is like carpentry,before you cut measure,measure and measure again. Investigate,calibrate then pull the trigger.
    N.G.

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    Up here we have the advantage of being real close to " shooting country" and don't have to travel far to find a rifle range. When you are changing to a different, new or heavier load, just make up batches of five of each load, using a " magic Marker" to keep them separate. Test each batch before you load up a sizeable number, and KEEP RECORDS!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat32rf View Post
    Up here we have the advantage of being real close to " shooting country" and don't have to travel far to find a rifle range. When you are changing to a different, new or heavier load, just make up batches of five of each load, using a " magic Marker" to keep them separate. Test each batch before you load up a sizeable number, and KEEP RECORDS!
    all ready done that step the only problem was my scope got hit on my 308 so i dont know if that was a good batch or not might try it again

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    Known as water capacity, some loads in certains calibers are near full and compressed. A 222 is one of those that depending on which powder you use you have to use a long tube funnel to try and get certain powder to fit into a case. Most of my loads in the 222 are full to the top and some over flow and still not at max, but compressed and have less pressure than a case loaded 3/4 full. Winchester is a very common brass but there is a few other older brands that weigh as good if not better than winchester. If you want good brass go with lapua or norma. Follow your many manuals that you will have when reloading. I have never found two manuals with the same loading data to load a caliber from min to max.
    Experience is what you gain when you didn't get what you wanted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tracker View Post
    Known as water capacity, some loads in certains calibers are near full and compressed. A 222 is one of those that depending on which powder you use you have to use a long tube funnel to try and get certain powder to fit into a case. Most of my loads in the 222 are full to the top and some over flow and still not at max, but compressed and have less pressure than a case loaded 3/4 full. Winchester is a very common brass but there is a few other older brands that weigh as good if not better than winchester. If you want good brass go with lapua or norma. Follow your many manuals that you will have when reloading. I have never found two manuals with the same loading data to load a caliber from min to max.
    you got that right already found that out thanks oilman

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    Its always best to stick to one brand of brass. As already said by others you can experience capacity differences which could be hazardous when you get close to max. The bench rest competitors actually weigh each case and each bullet for uniformity before loading a round. Accuracy is all about repeatable actions.

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