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Thread: There may be a solution to evasive carp

  1. #1
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    Default There may be a solution to evasive carp

    A virus in a Minnesota lake recently killed almost all of the carp in a lake - this virus only kills carp type fish and doesn't harm other fish or humans - it is called Koi herpesvirius - in aquaculture operations it has been documented to kill nearly 100 % of the carp population - in Australia it is being used to elminate Europeian carp that have taken over many waterways - some thought is being given to maybe using this virus could be used to kill carp where they are not wanted in north America

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  3. #2
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    Sounds like it might be the way to go.

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    Sounds promising. What's the down side, other repercussions? Any info on that ?

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by happy View Post
    Sounds promising. What's the down side, other repercussions? Any info on that ?
    Me and my buddies won't be shooting as many with our bows ?
    Glen

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    Been there. Done that. Carp populations are where they basically were before KHV showed up in the Kawarthas and Simcoe back in 2007. Maybe not quite as many big ones as before but the numbers overall have rebounded.

    I'd imagine those living on/using the waterways where KHV breaks out would much rather not have hundreds to thousands of Carp floating, rotting, and stinking along the shoreline, as much as getting rid of them completely would help the local wetlands and aquatic vegetation (and all the stuff that use those).

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    Common carp aren't invasive, they were brought to Ontario as a food source, the same as rainbow and brown trout.

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    If one sits back and looks at the position humanity is currently stewing in.... it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it is a very bad idea. Nobody knows for sure this Carp killer can not infect and another species, its all based on knowledge at hand.

    Leave it to humans, they will F it up!

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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by oaknut View Post
    If one sits back and looks at the position humanity is currently stewing in.... it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it is a very bad idea. Nobody knows for sure this Carp killer can not infect and another species, its all based on knowledge at hand.

    Leave it to humans, they will F it up!

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  10. #9
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    It's possible it could work we used nematodes (Although not a virus) to kill grubs and although I am n o longer in the field of pest control I am sure there are other natural pesticides we use. Something like this would have to be vigorously tested, would be interesting to see any data.

    Would it jump to another species?
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    It's possible it could work we used nematodes (Although not a virus) to kill grubs and although I am n o longer in the field of pest control I am sure there are other natural pesticides we use. Something like this would have to be vigorously tested, would be interesting to see any data.

    Would it jump to another species?
    The problem with attempting to bio control (introducing a foreign species to control a pest species) is the introduced species almost always finds an easier food source than the intended one, or adapts to the new environment in some way that wasn't intended and displaces native species.

    Lots of examples of this happening in the past. Hawaii and Australia have some interesting cases.

    "Top 10 invasive species: when pest control goes wrong | E&T Magazine" https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...ol-goes-wrong/



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