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Thread: New Zealand's 2nd Gun Buy Back

  1. #1
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    Default New Zealand's 2nd Gun Buy Back

    So they missed a bunch and added more to the list. Took in 56,000 guns during the last buy back and figure there is still 180,000 gun out there. That probably doesn't count the ones in the hands of criminals who didn't participate in the 1st buy back HaHa.

    Police are gearing up for another gun buyback, starting 1 February.

    The three-month programme - which will be based at police stations by appointment - aims to collect newly prohibited firearms, pistol carbine conversion kits and associated parts.

    The government banned military-style semi-automatics and assault rifles in 2019 following the Christchurch terror attacks. By June the following year, a second set of gun law reforms was passed in Parliament.

    The previous buyback scheme saw more than 56,000 weapons removed from circulation and $102 million paid out to gun owners.

    Deputy Commissioner Jevon McSkimming said that unlike the last programme, police wouldn't be holding any large collection events because new restrictions mainly affected smaller firearms.

    "This mainly impacts pistols, and those pump action rifles recently manufactured or imported through permit and dealer sales records," McSkimming said.

    Buyback prices will take into account the brand, make and model of the restricted item, and its base price and condition. Dealers and manufacturers will also be compensated for stock, with applications having to be within 60 days and supporting evidence then provided within 20.

    The government has allocated $15.5 million for compensation and administrative costs, with Williams noting this buyback is much smaller than the previous.

    "Having a firearms licence is a privilege, not a right. I know most of our firearms community are responsible law-abiding citizens who have only good intent. Our laws need to be robust enough to prevent firearms getting into the wrong hands" she said.

    However, National's police spokesperson Simeon Brown said the first gun buyback was "merely a marketing exercise" and tighter gun laws "punish law-abiding New Zealanders."

    "The police themselves estimated there could be as many as 180,000 now illegal firearms still floating around, but we will never know the exact number because even if a firearms register is put in place, those prohibited firearms will never appear in it," Brown said.
    The compensation for newly prohibited firearms and pistol carbine conversion kits will be:
    95 percent of the base price for those in new or near-new condition;
    70 percent of base price for those in used condition;
    25 percent of base price for those in poor condition.
    Last edited by MikePal; February 14th, 2021 at 04:30 PM.

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    They can buy back as many legal guns as they want. Black market is thriving in new Zealand . Now only the bad guys have them .

    More than they like are coming back the black market is replacing the legally own.

    Same will happen here it's already happening here it won't stop. The government can't control the people don't matter how much they try . Blood will still be shed .

    Taking away stuff that has a readily available black market won't save lives.

    "Firearm Seizures Reveal Thriving Black Market | Scoop News" https://m.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO2009...ack-market.htm

    Sent from my CLT-L04 using Tapatalk

  4. #3
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    Interesting article.

    What is more interseting,based on report-56 K guns bought for 102 million dollars.
    PAID out to gun owners-so they say.

    This makes average 1800 $ per gun.
    WOW-something wrong.

    Either guns are WAY pricier in NZ-or they buyback program makes cushy living for many (ie-management of the program is included).

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    Interesting article.

    What is more interseting,based on report-56 K guns bought for 102 million dollars.
    PAID out to gun owners-so they say.
    The article says" for compensation and administrative costs,"....lots on pens and pencils HaHa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    Interesting article.

    What is more interseting,based on report-56 K guns bought for 102 million dollars.
    PAID out to gun owners-so they say.

    This makes average 1800 $ per gun.
    WOW-something wrong.

    Either guns are WAY pricier in NZ-or they buyback program makes cushy living for many (ie-management of the program is included).
    I think that would be a good starting point in Canada. Remember they are not buying illegal guns, they are buying our legally owned property. You are not buying just the firearm you also paying me for the enjoyment it brought. If they do not dig deep into their pockets the buy back program will be an epic failure.

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    I hear You 4100..... ,alas i think their compensations scheme tells differently. See the list for compensation calculation in the OP's post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    The article says" for compensation and administrative costs,"....lots on pens and pencils HaHa.
    Admin costs would be significant. Advertising, personnel costs, storing, cataloging, securing, transporting and destroying seized firearms would carry a cost.

    This is where Canadian firearms owners can make ground by showing people who don't own firearms that gun bans are wildly expensive and don't reduced shootings or crime. It's the same strategy used to defeat the long gun registry and it worked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
    Admin costs would be significant. Advertising, personnel costs, storing, cataloging, securing, transporting and destroying seized firearms would carry a cost.

    This is where Canadian firearms owners can make ground by showing people who don't own firearms that gun bans are wildly expensive and don't reduced shootings or crime. It's the same strategy used to defeat the long gun registry and it worked.
    ......and I for one will be dragging my feet through the entire process.

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