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Thread: Reloading bullet tips

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rippin_355 View Post
    Bullets are bullets, which are the thing that exits your barrel. A loaded round is a cartridge.

    Sent from my SM-G925W8 using Tapatalk
    Be careful, things are called different things in different areas and it is fine, we all know what he is talking about. Brits call them tips, not bullets.

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  3. #12
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    Hey buddy I work in a ballistics lab so I'll weigh in.

    Go head and roll up 10 cartridges of your old recipe with the new projectiles. Observe your point new point of aim and if it's withing 2" of your point of aim then go ahead and just adjust your optic/sights. At the distances we shoot here in Ontario (100m or less) you shouldn't have to reinvent the wheel when it comes to your recipe. The differences between bullet designs (ogive) at the same weight is what's mainly going to affect accuracy but that really only starts to come into effect at longer ranges. Of course in the end the most important thing is that you load everything in a consistent manner so the tiny little bombs you make have the exact same result every time.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terrible_E View Post
    Hey buddy I work in a ballistics lab so I'll weigh in.

    Go head and roll up 10 cartridges of your old recipe with the new projectiles. Observe your point new point of aim and if it's withing 2" of your point of aim then go ahead and just adjust your optic/sights. At the distances we shoot here in Ontario (100m or less) you shouldn't have to reinvent the wheel when it comes to your recipe. The differences between bullet designs (ogive) at the same weight is what's mainly going to affect accuracy but that really only starts to come into effect at longer ranges. Of course in the end the most important thing is that you load everything in a consistent manner so the tiny little bombs you make have the exact same result every time.
    Welcome to the forum...and thanks for a very common sense answer.....some reloaders tend to get far too carried away in their quest for perfection.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  5. #14
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    I have two terms, reloaders and hand loaders.
    Reloaders tend to look for the most economical way to come up with an acceptable degree of accuracy for their intended purpose.
    Handloaders tend to look for the utmost degree of accuracy and trajectory to get their desired result. They are also more prepared to take more steps in the process to achieve this, ie: better case prep, more precise tolerances in bullet seating depth, flash hole deburring, primer pocket uniformity, etc:, etc:. They are tailoring the load to the individual gun.
    Doesn't mean that one is right and one is wrong. As Mike Pal says, some reloaders tend to get far too carried away in their quest for perfection. These reloaders I would call hand loaders.
    As others have touched on, pay attention to bullet seating depth. A different bullet will have a different ogive which will dictate the point that it will contact the rifling. The closer to the rifling it is, the higher the pressure created. You may have to seat it deeper, or you may be able to seat it further out.
    Whichever, just make sure that the completed round will still fit in the magazine. I have seen people come up with an awesome load, only to find when they get to their hunting ground that they have a single shot rifle now.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu View Post
    I have two terms, reloaders and hand loaders.
    Reloaders tend to look for the most economical way to come up with an acceptable degree of accuracy for their intended purpose.
    Handloaders tend to look for the utmost degree of accuracy and trajectory to get their desired result.
    or it can be explained with this comparison:

    A handloader can either make cheap ammunition or custom-specification bullets. It’s the difference between doing your own car repairs and building your own engine from the short block to up to the injectors. The former is to save cash and do something yourself, the latter is because you need something nobody sells.
    Last edited by MikePal; April 10th, 2021 at 07:39 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  7. #16
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    Check for current load data on new brand, if same go to go. Then go out and shoot your groups - that is where you will notice the difference if any. Adjust load to new bullet head.
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Kemptville, for 2020, Ontario Libertarian Party

  8. #17
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    My new 55gr cast and powder coated .223 bullets performed very differently with different powders. So in this case I started with 100 new rounds, 5 loaded cases per row, with different powder combos all based on reloading book data. During the shooting, when I got to my normal Varget loads for coyote and commercial bullet heads, they were 3" off factory. Lots of little variances, and I still haven't settled on final load. Just gotta find the time to do more load development.223 Ladder.jpg
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Kemptville, for 2020, Ontario Libertarian Party

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terrible_E View Post
    Hey buddy I work in a ballistics lab so I'll weigh in.

    Go head and roll up 10 cartridges of your old recipe with the new projectiles. Observe your point new point of aim and if it's withing 2" of your point of aim then go ahead and just adjust your optic/sights. At the distances we shoot here in Ontario (100m or less) you shouldn't have to reinvent the wheel when it comes to your recipe. The differences between bullet designs (ogive) at the same weight is what's mainly going to affect accuracy but that really only starts to come into effect at longer ranges. Of course in the end the most important thing is that you load everything in a consistent manner so the tiny little bombs you make have the exact same result every time.
    I would still be concerned about pressure, I have one rifle that 2 different bullets of the same charge and bullet weight go from no pressure signs to a sticky bolt.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    I would still be concerned about pressure, I have one rifle that 2 different bullets of the same charge and bullet weight go from no pressure signs to a sticky bolt.
    Not 100% sure what's happening there. I'd need a lot more information to be sure but I'll hazard a guess. Sometimes the different design of the bullet can cause a small reduction in case capacity when seated to the same depth. For instance I use two kinds of Hornady 123gr bullet to reload for my sks (I know, I know, I have mental problems) and seat both of them to 2.2 even. Due to the design the SST bullet sits lower into the case than the FMJ which makes the round a little bit hotter. Just less room for the gases to expand which ends up putting a "bigger push" on the bullet. Could be lots of other things but this is the first guess I would make.

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