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Thread: Obtaining Hunting Permission in SW ON: A Comprehensive Study.

  1. #21
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    Very interesting survey but I am not to surprised by the results. I think the main reason hunters are refused is "liability" and a general lack of trust these day's in other humans.

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  3. #22
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    I think part of it has to do with location, and maybe the possibility that landowners already have people on their land or have had or heard or bad experiences.

    Up here I find it much different and have never had a hard time getting access. Could also be that I am from the area and I have permission to also mention certain people that I know which probably gives me an extra boost.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gilroy View Post
    Very interesting survey but I am not to surprised by the results. I think the main reason hunters are refused is "liability" and a general lack of trust these day's in other humans.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  4. #23
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    Then there is the opposite, a couple farms around here they say yes to everyone who knocks on the door. Especially the Old retired owners.

    I've heard of guys showing up on opening day at some places and 4-5 P/Us are sitting at the gate.

    My neighbour did that by mistake. Said yes before he realised he had also told me (years before) I had permission. On opening morn one year, a set of headlights pulled into the yard after my buddy and I had already set up for Turkey.

    I had to leave the blind and make my way up to stop them from hunting. That could get dicey.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by oaknut View Post
    I don't see any issues with a property owner denying access, yes, it sucks however given the human track record it easier to say no.

    Land isn't about to get any cheaper without an economic crash of unbelievable proportion.

    There's one way to guarantee yourself land to hunt, buy it. The problem comes when you then have to work 7 days a week to pay for it.....

    This was my issue as my hunting access was actually part of my work contract, given that I won't be hunting that area much longer I had to take on a rather expensive opportunity this year.

    Land is rarely a bad investment, the world is only getting smaller.

    Sent from my SM-G973W using Tapatalk
    very well said, finally got hired somewhere. planning on saving money to buy some bush north somewhere. land is the best investment. they dont make any more of it!

  6. #25
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    Yes that does happen, especially for goose hunting around here. Farmers in my area really hate gees and will let everyone hunt them.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    Then there is the opposite, a couple farms around here they say yes to everyone who knocks on the door. Especially the Old retired owners.

    I've heard of guys showing up on opening day at some places and 4-5 P/Us are sitting at the gate.

    My neighbour did that by mistake. Said yes before he realised he had also told me (years before) I had permission. On opening morn one year, a set of headlights pulled into the yard after my buddy and I had already set up for Turkey.

    I had to leave the blind and make my way up to stop them from hunting. That could get dicey.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  7. #26
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    I also knock on lots of doors this time of year driving side roads looking for turkeys. 2 things I've found:

    Deer is a universal no-go. If a landowner is even remotely ok with deer hunting, a co-worker, relative or neighbor is already hunting it and has staked an exclusive claim.
    Sometimes I can get permission to hunt waterfowl or turkeys on these farms.

    Mennonites are typically more accommodating.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorlife View Post
    I also knock on lots of doors this time of year driving side roads looking for turkeys. 2 things I've found:

    Deer is a universal no-go. If a landowner is even remotely ok with deer hunting, a co-worker, relative or neighbor is already hunting it and has staked an exclusive claim.
    Sometimes I can get permission to hunt waterfowl or turkeys on these farms.

    Mennonites are typically more accommodating.
    start with a relation ship around turkey/ waterfowl/ small game, after some years and staying in contact with them/ having conversations with them try asking about deer again. ask if anyone hunts the property for deer and if so when/ what area. see if you can hunt the December hunt if the others go in nov or vice versa so you arent interfering with their hunting. just a suggestion.

    usually asking to hunt big game off the bat is not the way to go.

  9. #28
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    I think it probably helps a lot if your from the area. One thing I have also noticed is the most of the people having a hard time finding land are in Southern Ontario. Yes some do have a bit of a hard time in Eastern Ontario but I don't believe it is as difficult here as Southern Ontario.

    It also helps that we have a lot more crown this way as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bowjob View Post
    start with a relation ship around turkey/ waterfowl/ small game, after some years and staying in contact with them/ having conversations with them try asking about deer again. ask if anyone hunts the property for deer and if so when/ what area. see if you can hunt the December hunt if the others go in nov or vice versa so you arent interfering with their hunting. just a suggestion.

    usually asking to hunt big game off the bat is not the way to go.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  10. #29
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    All my spots the land owners tell me of all the people that come asking for permission. I think the worst you can do is offer money. Most of them it turns then right off, Think your some city boy looking to just shoot something for a fee.

    I spent 9hrs cleaning a pig barn in middle of September to be able to hunt opening day goose hunting. It was nasty and I didn't like it, But farmer was impressed and he owns at least 4500 acres and rents more. He's so happy to see me, He even texts me when he sees big bucks in the combine or whenever really.

    This is 45minutes from my place, I don't know anyone in the area and I know the local guys don't like seeing my truck parked in farm laneways..


    4 trucks sitting on the road watching us goose hunt opening day. They would yell when birds came, honk the horn until they seen me walking out there. I got pictures of all the trucks and showed the land owner. He says they are neighbours and will NEVER hunt his land for what they did to me. Who got the last laugh now LOL

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    Last edited by SongDog; April 14th, 2021 at 04:13 PM.
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  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
    I guess I'm one of those with a "scrooge mentality." We have owned 40 acres of bushlot in South Western Ontario for 23 years. I hunted it more frequently in the past although now perhaps once a year for turkey.

    I did not save the money to buy the land, pay the taxes and keep it up to let complete strangers hunt on it. Over the years I have received letters, calls, even had hunters knock on the door to ask. I've had casual acquaintances ask too. All have been politely turned down.

    Your post has not convinced me to change my approach. I'm hardly "shooting myself in the foot" by not letting you "get rid of nuisance animals and trespassers." I can quite capably look after them myself and don't need your help.
    You've misread my post. I said that I am happy to be denied by people that say themselves or others are hunting on that property like I mentioned. Infact, if there was a hunter, birdwatcher, or any outdoors person utilising every forest in Ontario, then I'd be perfectly content with having zero permissions for private property. I'm happy to hear you're using your property you've worked hard for and would never ask permission to hunt it to not interfere with yours, your family's, and your friend's hunting experiences.
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

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