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Thread: Obtaining Hunting Permission in SW ON: A Comprehensive Study.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    What did you offer in return for permission to hunt?
    I've offered labour of any kind, removal of any nuissance animals, keeping a diligent eye out for tresspassers (that they say they have lots of) and of course respecting their property and any rules they lay out. As outlined in my letter.
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

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  3. #32
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    Thanks everyone for the responses and helpful pointers!!! Been busy with final examinations all week so I haven't been able to address this post in a while. So I'm going to address some common points being brought up here.

    1. What did I offer?

    I offered labour services of any kind as many of these were farm places and I have extensive experience working in orchards and landscaping. As well as getting rid of nuisance animals and trespassers as well as offering game meat which many of my other property owners appreciate.

    2. Why are they obligated to give you permission?
    They aren't. I'm just mentioning it's counter productive to dismiss a hunter for utilising and respecting your land while simultaneously complaining about Trespassers and coyotes eating your chickens. Which is a problem hunters can easily solve free of charge. Hence "shooting themselves in the foot".

    3. why should they let you hunt on land that they or others hunt?
    Simple, they shouldn't. Whenever I am denied permission for the reason of others hunting or others using the property, I am happy. I always thank them for letting others use their property and I also thank them for being mindful of the experience of the hunters on their property. I wouldn't want to encroach on someone else's hunt. As I mentioned before. If every private parcel in Ontario had an outdoorsman of any kind I'd never ask permission and be happy knowing someone is enjoying those forests.
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Menard View Post
    I admire your tenacity! It difficult putting yourself out there to the extent that you did. Iím discouraged by your results and I would be interested in learning more about the responses that you received e.g. reasons for denial.

    If I may suggest, contact Ray Blades (editor of Ontario Out of Doors) and share your story. He might be interested to publish your story.
    Thanks! I'll consider giving him a ring!
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

  5. #34
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    This thread makes me glad I don’t live in Southern Ontario.

    In all seriousness, way too many people and not nearly enough land.

    I’ve had reasonable luck getting permission to hunt wild turkey - typically family, neighbours, etc.

    Deer is very difficult to obtain permission for - most private lands have had people hunting there for years.

  6. #35
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    I exclusively hunt Conservation Authority land now. I've had way more success on it due to the land being larger tracts of land. I'll gladly pay $60 a year to have access to hundreds of acres of land to hunt.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MihajloSimsic View Post
    Thanks! I'll consider giving him a ring!
    Have you ever considered buying into land or a camp with your Dad or relatives or friends?

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obi-wanShinobi View Post
    I exclusively hunt Conservation Authority land now. I've had way more success on it due to the land being larger tracts of land. I'll gladly pay $60 a year to have access to hundreds of acres of land to hunt.
    this^^^

    im not sure how crowded they get tho, but everytime i pass by those tracts, they only seem to have 1 or 2 cars pulled off to the side of the road. This is a very good recommendation

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowjob View Post
    this^^^

    im not sure how crowded they get tho, but everytime i pass by those tracts, they only seem to have 1 or 2 cars pulled off to the side of the road. This is a very good recommendation
    In my opinion, it's the best option for new hunters. I rarely ever see another hunter and there is plenty of space. I've hunted smaller parcels of private land 100 acres and under. They simply don't hold anywhere near the same number of animals.

    Most Conservation Authorities require an OFAH membership. Even then for less than $100/year you can have permission/access to hundreds of acres of land to hunt.

    I realize some people just love the idea of having sole permission to hunt a property and that's great too.
    Last edited by Obi-wanShinobi; April 18th, 2021 at 02:40 PM.

  10. #39
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    interesting post OP. i enjoy your qualitative study based on experience.
    a few factors to consider.
    your sample size... its quite a few farms but might be of interest to see how many people they also have knocking on the door. how close are you to the larger city centre. you're knocking on doors near windsor and london. how many other people are from the city hoping to get out.

    as a person of colour myself-- also take that into consideration. sadly you are profiled the moment you step on the land. not sure but take a look at what you look like. you cant change that but people have their own narratives about race-- even if you are of European decent

    are you a local to that particular zip code or from the city. i must say that goes a long long way. people are slow to open their gates to folks from toronto vs the kid who works at their feed mill, etc.

    the people who own the land. who are they. now adays landowners arent just farmers and many are investors who own property and rent it out. knowing the people who are asking to hunt their land is so key.

    liability. thats a big factor now adays for many farmers. by saying yes to you, they are taking a risk. would you take a risk on a stranger? I would never.

    i admire your stick to it tactics and it will eventually and hopefully pay off... just a few things to consider.

    others posting about public spots... yeah... they are truly under-utilized come deer archery season. and with all the gas you've burned knocking on doors, its possible to save that and put it towards a conservation area. theres a few around here that is like 160 or 300. thinking about how much i spend on gas, its almost worth it to just do that.

    all in all, fun thread! thanks for posting!

  11. #40
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    one last thought too... not every bush is meant to be hunted. its actually better for neighbouring properties becasuse come rutting time, the boys venture from their hiding spots to the out and open. if you see a property with a big red dot, hunt around them if you can and you wont be disappointed!

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