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Thread: Dad's first Nuissance beaver

  1. #1
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    Default Dad's first Nuissance beaver

    This beaver was wreaking havoc in a small pond. Putting down half a dozen trees and chewing the crap out of a dozen more. Not only that but building a dam in a nearby creek flooding all the low ground and killing half an acre of trees.

    Taken with a .17HMR savage. 56lbs, lots of fat, and VERY yummy.
    Screenshot_20210518_002334.jpg
    IMG_20210516_171810.jpg

    I'm also going to add that we caught a few bluegil and crappie in the stocked pond for an appetizer .
    Screenshot_20210518_002717.jpg
    Screenshot_20210518_002706.jpg
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
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  3. #2
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    Good Job, the .17 HMR is a awesome nuisance Beaver round.
    I had Beaver stew before and it was great.
    "Only dead fish go with the flow."
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  4. #3
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    I miss those days..I used to have an infestation of the buggers in my front corner. They kept plugging the culvert and flooding the lane way. Lots of late evening hunts.

    I started out using the 6.5 x 55 Swede, but the late evening darkness and small target (head shot) required I switch to 12 ga '00' buck'.

    Bought a few home and harvested a fair bit of really rather pleasant meat. Great for crock pot stew.
    Last edited by MikePal; May 18th, 2021 at 05:18 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  5. #4
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    That's a nice sized beaver and I'm glad to know it did not go to waste.

  6. #5
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    I'm surprised you guys enjoyed eating it without first removing all the fat. I tried beaver once like that and we couldn't eat it. The fat gave it a taste of castor and reminded me of the taste you get from bear tallow. None of us could eat it. The best I've had is parboiled before roasting. Fat and silver skin removed, then 20 min boil to remove the fat. You then float the fat scum off the pot before removing the meat. How do you other folk prep the meat before eating it ?

  7. #6
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    I haven't heard of many people who eat beaver!

    That thrid photo almost looks like filets of fish

    Great post.

    Those things do some serious damage if not kept in check.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenelon View Post
    I'm surprised you guys enjoyed eating it without first removing all the fat. I tried beaver once like that and we couldn't eat it. The fat gave it a taste of castor and reminded me of the taste you get from bear tallow. None of us could eat it. The best I've had is parboiled before roasting. Fat and silver skin removed, then 20 min boil to remove the fat. You then float the fat scum off the pot before removing the meat. How do you other folk prep the meat before eating it ?
    One way I was told to do it by a Indian chap from Northern Ontario was to as you said remove all fat and silver skin and baste it in mustard and brown sugar and either roast in the oven or BBQ and I must say when done that way it was more than palatable.
    OFAH Member since 88.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowjob View Post
    I haven't heard of many people who eat beaver!

    That thrid photo almost looks like filets of fish

    Great post.

    Those things do some serious damage if not kept in check.

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    Haha you'd be right. Those are Crappie and Bluegil fillets caught in the same pond as the beaver.
    "When you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

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