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Thread: Video: Loon Parent Returns to Nest (Egg Turning)

  1. #1
    Apprentice

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    Default Video: Loon Parent Returns to Nest (Egg Turning)

    Hello All,

    I have been monitoring this same loon pair for the last eight years. Each season they nest in a small cane area.
    Here footage I shot yesterday, showing one of the parents returning to the nest and repositioning the eggs.



    Cheers,
    Justin

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  3. #2
    Borderline Spammer

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    Thats awesome, Thanks for sharing. Always love to see what you post. keep it up!
    "No one's interested in something you didn't do"

  4. #3
    Apprentice

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    Thanks, man - appreciate the kind words. Cheers!

  5. #4
    Member for Life

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    Beauty vid! Thanks for posting!

  6. #5
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    That is a great still pic...
    Question, doesn't it ever flood them out, nest looks awful close to the water.
    Neat video.
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  7. #6
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    That was a fine video to watch. Thanks. I read they only feed the biggest chick from each nest. Is that true?

    edit: wrong bird .... The pileated woodpecker only feeds one chick.
    Last edited by Sharon; June 3rd, 2021 at 02:37 PM.
    " We are more than our gender, skin color, class, sexuality or age; we are unlimited potential, and can not be defined by one label." quote A. Bartlett


  8. #7
    Apprentice

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    fratri - This is a floating cattail island so can't flood, no matter how high the water gets. Saying that, some of the other nests - that are made of mud and vegetation and found in open water areas, can be subject to flooding if the water rises enough. I have yet to see that happen.
    As for their position close to the water, they need to be this way as loons are pretty much useless when it comes to walking on dry land. Their legs are positioned at the very back of their body, allowing them to swim proficiently but hardly walk. A loon also needs a long stretch of water in order to take flight (they run on the water to get airborne) so if a loon was too far up on dry land, it would be stranded, unable to fly and pretty much unable to walk back to water.

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