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Thread: Lake O Salmon

  1. #1
    Getting the hang of it

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    Default Lake O Salmon

    Salmon gods were nice to me, made up for the Second turkey tag that went unfilled.

    Some pics from the weekend.

    I usually troll between T.O island to bluff and back.

    Salmon-3.jpgSalmon-2.jpgSalmon-1.jpg

    need to get a new smoker, any recommendations ?
    CCFR, OFAH Member
    Its all about the Journey

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  3. #2
    Mod Squad

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    Nice fish. If the boat wasn't in the shop I'd be there too.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  4. #3
    Post-a-holic

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    Nice report pal...great looking fish....
    This isn't a test run................Enjoy er'.......

  5. #4
    Apprentice

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    Bradley. The best

  6. #5
    Getting the hang of it

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    Great salmon.

  7. #6
    Borderline Spammer

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    Should get the boat out ?
    Glen

  8. #7
    Has all the answers

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    My advice would be to pitch those fish into the local dump as they are pretty much toxic waste. The big chinook will probably glow if you turn out the lights ! Sadly, there's no way I'd personally smoke or eat those for personal consumption. See https://www.ontario.ca/page/fish-con...rt?id=43357917
    and remember these results are only for skinless dorsal fillet meat. You can double the contaminant level if you consume the fatty belly and adipose tissue as well.

  9. #8
    Has all the answers

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    Looks like the Lake Ontario salmon have only been MOE tested for a single contaminant - PCB's. God knows what else is in them. My one friend used to feed the salmon to his Walker hounds as a supplement with their kibble. Most of the fish were only 4 to 8 lbs. Eight of his nine dogs were dead with hemangiosarcoma, pancreatic or lymphatic cancers before they reached their fifth year of life. Two of the eight were gone in less than three years. I wouldn't touch that fish with a twenty foot pole !

    Superscripts in the advisory tables identify the contaminant or group of contaminants that are causing consumption restrictions within a given species/location:

    Mercury - Mercury, is converted to methylmercury and absorbed by a fish either from water passing over its gills or it is ingested with its diet. Since fish eliminate mercury at a very slow rate, concentrations of this substance gradually increase. Fish at the top of the food web such as Walleye and Pike usually have the highest mercury levels.
    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) - PCBs are a group of chlorinated organic compounds first commercially developed in the late 1920s and banned in the 1970s. They persist for decades in the natural environment and readily accumulate in the aquatic ecosystem.
    Dioxin-like PCBs - These are a select group of PCBs with harmful properties similar to dioxins.
    Dioxins/Furans - Dioxins and furans are unintentional by-products of several industrial processes and, in some cases, incomplete combustion. Of 210 different dioxins and furans, 17 are toxic enough to be of concern.
    Toxaphene - Toxaphene is an extremely persistent insecticide in the aquatic environment. It was removed from general use in Canada in 1974 and restricted in the United States in 1982.
    PerFluoroAlkyl and PolyFluoroAlkyl Substances (PFAS) - PFAS are a family of chemicals that make materials water, stain and oil repellent and have been in a wide array of consumer products since the 1950s. PFAS do not break down easily.
    Selenium - Selenium is a metal found in fish tissue but only occasionally at levels requiring consumption restrictions.
    Arsenic - Arsenic is a metal found in fish tissue but only occasionally at levels requiring consumption restrictions.
    PolyBrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) - PBDEs are used as flame retardants in building materials, electronics and many household products. Some of these chemicals have been banned or phased out in recent years.
    PolyChlorinated Naphthalenes (PCNs) - PCNs are industrial chemicals. While no longer used in Canada, they may be produced unintentionally in different chemical processes.
    Chromium - Chromium is a metal found in fish tissue but only occasionally at levels requiring consumption restrictions.
    Photomirex - See mirex below.
    Mirex - Mirex is a chlorinated carbon compound used as a pesticide in the southern United States but never registered for such use in Canada. Some mirex is transformed into photomirex.
    Lead - Metals such as lead are found in fish tissue but only occasionally at levels requiring consumption restrictions.
    Cadmium - Cadmium is a metal found in fish tissue but only occasionally at levels requiring consumption restrictions.
    For more information on these substances, please contact the Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program at 416-327-6816, Toll-free: 1-800-820-2716 or fishguide@ontario.ca. For information on health implications of these substances, please visit Health Canada or contact Toll-free: 1-866-225-0709.
    Last edited by Fenelon; June 17th, 2021 at 07:21 AM.

  10. #9
    Borderline Spammer

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    Nice catch and looks like a nice day out. I wouldn't eat them. I work with Canada Centre for Inland waters and other local environmental agencies that test Lake Ontario and surrounding areas. I see some of the data they get and talk to the technicians that collect the data and what they tell me, scares the hell outta me.
    "No one's interested in something you didn't do"

  11. #10
    Getting the hang of it

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    Good/ Scary info!!! thanks guys.

    we usually eat them once every summer, as a tradition by Hanlan ..., but yea those sound scary !!

    Derby starting soon, get your boats ready.
    CCFR, OFAH Member
    Its all about the Journey

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