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Thread: Pear Tree's.

  1. #1
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    Default Pear Tree's.

    So I got a couple of these growing up in the orchard with the apples tree's, problem is they do not give fruit. So in an attempt to have them cross pollinated I just bought a couple of new tree's from Canadian Tire and see if I can get them going next spring.

    Worse come's to the worse I will ask a friend to show me how to graft some apple onto the pear tree's I have right now and graft
    a few varieties of apple onto my existing apple tree's.

    I had a hard time last year finding a pear tree in this area and saw a bunch in Canadian Tire in Bancroft in the spring.

    They generally do not drop their prices up there but last week my wife scored two tree's on sale at a local CT and they went from
    $69.99 down to $44.00 down to $22.00 which is what I got then for apiece. Nice sturdy 6 foot healthy trees. They are zoned for 4 at minus 35.

    Any body up in the Kawartha's have pear trees that have survived and give fruit.

    The manager of this store where I got them says people asked for them, he ordered in a bunch and nobody showed up to buy them.

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  3. #2
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    Are you pruning your pears? Don't think apple would take, might want to try Asian pear.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    Are you pruning your pears? Don't think apple would take, might want to try Asian pear.
    Not really pruning them, probably better to say neglecting them. One of the new one's is a seckle pear and the other a Bartlett, pretty sure the established one's are Bartlett. At least I hope so because I just found out on line that the seckle does not cross well with the Bartlett.

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    I know absolutely nothing about fruit trees other than when they get older, their yield drops. But one thing that does occur is some trees get shocked when disturbed or transplanted and may go dormant for a year or two. Red pine is a classic example. Kick it around a bit when young and it stops growing for 3 years.

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    Transplanting usually is a shock on plants so be kind to them. Prepping the spot you want to put them in is very important also. Make sure the hole is big enough and soil is correct (ph/type) for the type of plant you are putting in. Watering afterwards is very important as is the type of fertilizer you should be using . You shouldn't have to prune for the first few years but if dead branches happen they should be pruned off for the health of the tree. Always clean your shears before hand to avoid infecting your plant.
    Good Luck & Good Hunting !

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by longpointer View Post
    Transplanting usually is a shock on plants so be kind to them. Prepping the spot you want to put them in is very important also. Make sure the hole is big enough and soil is correct (ph/type) for the type of plant you are putting in. Watering afterwards is very important as is the type of fertilizer you should be using . You shouldn't have to prune for the first few years but if dead branches happen they should be pruned off for the health of the tree. Always clean your shears before hand to avoid infecting your plant.
    HI LP-what do you recommend wiping shears down to avoid infecting the plant?

  8. #7
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    Ivory dish Soap and water.
    A true sportsman counts his achievements in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport. - S. Pope

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    When I use to do Pruning we wiped down the pruners with Alcohol, fire blight can easily infect a fresh cut.

    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    HI LP-what do you recommend wiping shears down to avoid infecting the plant?
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013) OFAH Member

  10. #9
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    Thank you guys for the advice

  11. #10
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    All of the above sounds good ! Alcohol is great as it removes any oils and evaporates and you can carry a small bottle with you but even Dawn dish soap and a good rinse is better then nothing.
    Good Luck & Good Hunting !

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