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Thread: re: Salt lick cubed 50lb

  1. #1
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    Default re: Salt lick cubed 50lb

    Hey everyone, hope all is well. Regarding the above how long does it usually last, I realize a lot of it depends on the game that frequent/hit the block along with rain....but generally how long does it usually last, 1-2-3 + months...placed my blocks out during the ending of turkey season. Honestly I don't mind the drive, it lugging the blocks threw the bush in this heat/humidity i'm trying to avoid
    Any advice will be appreciated

    Thanks

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  3. #2
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    Dont worry,50 lbs is a lot.It will soak into the soil,and the deer will eat the salty soil as much,as they would lick the block itself.

  4. #3
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    I put this one out end of April. They really going after block of wood
    think it will last year if I can keep neighbours cows away from it


  5. #4
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    It depends on the activity. I personally don't use them as I hunt public land and I am always on the move looking for new spots ( and every thing I do is on foot and don't feel like lugging them in ). I have however come across them in the bush. I have seen both the type in the photo and the typical blue livestock ones. From what I have seen both types will last a very long time ( up to a year ). This is only what I have witnessed on public land.

  6. #5
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    I have a spot on a public land ,where i deliver somewhere at the end of every February ,20 kg of cattle salt, in a bag.
    Pour it on the snow,white is white-blends in nicely(tried blue once-oh boy,it was visible from a "mile").
    Public land !!!
    Not into drawing much attention .

    I killed over the salt lick a 40 years old pine tree, because i poured salt over and over to the close proximity of it.
    Non intentional,lesson learned.

    There is (after about 20 years ,and 400 kg of salt)a 12 feet DIA depression,max depth about 2 feet.
    All the missing dirt,and good portion of the large pine tree roots with some portion of the trunk ,are all gone.
    Deer,porcupine,racoon,rabbit-all likes the salt lick.

    Treetrunk-soil,dirt,salt-all are a go.

    For the ones wondering-No,i do not hunt over the salt .
    It is ways and off from my stand.
    But-i do population count over it,and i tend to belive i feed the deer with something potentially beneficial.
    Last edited by gbk; August 30th, 2021 at 05:10 PM.

  7. #6
    Has all the answers

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    I bury mine. I found that deer donít normally touch the block but eat the soil around it. Burying it makes bit dissolves faster.
    A true sportsman counts his achievements in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport. - S. Pope

  8. #7
    Just starting out

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    I'll put a block out in July or August and there's always a bit left on the ground the year after. Like someone else mentioned, it'll seep into the ground and play it's role long after it has disappeared.

  9. #8
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    Only half a year ...
    the other half will be frozen under the snow and ice
    will be inaccessible to the game ...

    Quote Originally Posted by sevennine View Post
    I'll put a block out in July or August and there's always a bit left on the ground the year after. Like someone else mentioned, it'll seep into the ground and play it's role long after it has disappeared.

  10. #9
    Borderline Spammer

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    I put out in spring and some left following spring

  11. #10
    Apprentice

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    I replace mine in the same spot every year when the snow is gone, I believe early spring into late summer is when the deer need the nutrients the most, whether for antler growth or lactation. Rarely see any animals on the lick come fall time into winter, at least compared to the numbers I have early in the year.
    John

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