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Thread: Beaver Dam breaking tips

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by js4fn View Post
    Hahaha. Gun shop or order from out west. They can mail it you want 1 pounders shoot with .223 or faster
    Hope you have no Karen’s near by. Wow can they cause a lot of
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald View Post
    What is a Karen? What can they cause a lot of?
    Quote Originally Posted by Fisherman View Post
    They are the ones that stomp their feet and cry over the least little thing they believe is wrong. They will scream and kick and call the fuzz and tr and make life miserable for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by rodmcd View Post
    There are male Karens also. Not sure what they are called?
    rodmcd
    Quote Originally Posted by js4fn View Post
    Karen on Roids
    If you're close enough to be concerned than a good neighbour would try to contact them and give them a heads up that you're setting off an explosion.
    That would be the considerate thing to do right?
    Last edited by finsfurfeathers; April 15th, 2022 at 01:11 PM.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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  3. #32
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Default Beaver Dam breaking tips

    Umm didnít realize vibration could be felt 10 miles away didnít seem bad at all 100yd mark

  4. #33
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    I have heard them referred to as Kyle as well, only funny when they turn purple from screaming and forgetting to breathe.
    John

  5. #34
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    Fifty years ago -things were WAY simpler back then - my father wanted to deal with a large beaver dam flooding our property. He enlisted a guy who knew a guy, apparently an explosives expert (later discovered to be a pyromaniac). The expert suggested my father buy a case of dynamite, 50 sticks. So, my father walked into the hardware store, no permit or license required back then. They hardware guy talked my father down to half a case, and off he went. On the prescribed day, they traipsed into the swamp, dug a hole in the dam, and wrapped up 12 sticks with electrical tape, creating a charge that looked like it belonged to Wyle E. Coyote. They lit the fuse (didn't know enough to use a blasting cap) and retired to a safe distance via their hip waders. When the thing went off, my father describes stumps, logs and debris 100 feet in the air. All pictures on the wall of our cottage rattled to the floor. Funniest part is that as soon as the blast hit, my fathers brother, who lived 4 miles away, immediately called to ask what in hell my father was up to - recognizing instantly who was behind the shock wave that rattled the windows of the whole village. It did make a very large hole in the dam, which took the beavers about 3 nights to fix.
    There is an interesting later chapter to the story, because the left over dynamite was forgotten on a shelf in the shop, until rediscovered some years later, with the nitroglycerine dripping out of it.....

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ouzel View Post
    Fifty years ago -things were WAY simpler back then - my father wanted to deal with a large beaver dam flooding our property. He enlisted a guy who knew a guy, apparently an explosives expert (later discovered to be a pyromaniac). The expert suggested my father buy a case of dynamite, 50 sticks. So, my father walked into the hardware store, no permit or license required back then. They hardware guy talked my father down to half a case, and off he went. On the prescribed day, they traipsed into the swamp, dug a hole in the dam, and wrapped up 12 sticks with electrical tape, creating a charge that looked like it belonged to Wyle E. Coyote. They lit the fuse (didn't know enough to use a blasting cap) and retired to a safe distance via their hip waders. When the thing went off, my father describes stumps, logs and debris 100 feet in the air. All pictures on the wall of our cottage rattled to the floor. Funniest part is that as soon as the blast hit, my fathers brother, who lived 4 miles away, immediately called to ask what in hell my father was up to - recognizing instantly who was behind the shock wave that rattled the windows of the whole village. It did make a very large hole in the dam, which took the beavers about 3 nights to fix.
    There is an interesting later chapter to the story, because the left over dynamite was forgotten on a shelf in the shop, until rediscovered some years later, with the nitroglycerine dripping out of it.....
    Great story but I think that and similar stories are the reason why things are way more complicated now a days.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  7. #36
    Getting the hang of it

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    Chad is married to Karen

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