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Thread: A sad farewell to Ruffed Grouse?

  1. #11
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    Believe it or not, there's decent numbers in 78 from what I've seen or heard drumming in the spring. I don't typically hunt this WMU as I don't have access but the birds are around.

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  3. #12
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    Iv've kept a hunting journal since I was kid. I dug them out and the last "good" days of grouse numbers in my area was about 1997. A three hour hunt would usually yield 4 to 7 flushes without a dog. It would be 10 to 12 if the Lab came along. Then the downward spiral began and it wasn't due to habitat loss or change, or hunting pressure, or poor nesting conditions. I dont think predation is the key factor causing decline either. There's lots of strong evidence pointing the finger at WNV, but I'm wondering if neonic pesticide use is also part of the problem. Take look at what neonics have done since their approval for use. We've lost most of our insect pollinators. Some species of beneficial wasps and bees have massive population collapse. Some native species of bumblebees are now gone. We lost all of our bats to white nose syndrome in the blink of an eye. Again, they're blaming neonics for endocrine disruption, global extinction and massive population declines in essentially every aerial insectivorous bird species due to insect biomass reduction (every one of our eight swallow and swift species, goat-suckers (knight-hawk, whip-poor will. 80% decline in some species in less than a decade!).

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenelon View Post
    Iv've kept a hunting journal since I was kid. I dug them out and the last "good" days of grouse numbers in my area was about 1997. A three hour hunt would usually yield 4 to 7 flushes without a dog. It would be 10 to 12 if the Lab came along. Then the downward spiral began and it wasn't due to habitat loss or change, or hunting pressure, or poor nesting conditions. I dont think predation is the key factor causing decline either. There's lots of strong evidence pointing the finger at WNV, but I'm wondering if neonic pesticide use is also part of the problem. Take look at what neonics have done since their approval for use. We've lost most of our insect pollinators. Some species of beneficial wasps and bees have massive population collapse. Some native species of bumblebees are now gone. We lost all of our bats to white nose syndrome in the blink of an eye. Again, they're blaming neonics for endocrine disruption, global extinction and massive population declines in essentially every aerial insectivorous bird species due to insect biomass reduction (every one of our eight swallow and swift species, goat-suckers (knight-hawk, whip-poor will. 80% decline in some species in less than a decade!).
    Did neonics appear aroung 1997? Just curious. I have a bee keeper contact that swears the neonics were going to put him out of business.

  5. #14
    Has too much time on their hands

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    The last few years I see fewer birds in 61. There still around, just not seeing as many on the ground poking around.

  6. #15
    Getting the hang of it

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    I'm in 65 and trap through the winter running a few short lines and have seen a slight increase of birds in the past years but the numbers are still quite low. A few friends that have lived here longer than me don't even bother hunting grouse anymore. My brother lives in 39 just west of Sudbury and he's never seen so many on his property. In early November, I was in Dryden and took this picture with 5 grouse in a tree.
    IMG_20211102_174310.jpg

  7. #16
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    55A, definitely a decline in the last few years however, the property I just lucked in to is absolutely ripe with them. Haven't taken a single one this year given the time constraints but I see them every day in there.

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  8. #17
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    I've been hunting 56 for the past 6 years as I now have a cottage there. In the spring, I usually see the odd one here and there but come the fall when its time to hunt them they are gone. Not sure if they move to different cover or if predators get them during the summer but at this point I don't really target them in 56.

  9. #18
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    Great numbers in North East Ontario this year.
    That’s what we had for dinner tonight. Mmmmmm
    "Only dead fish go with the flow."
    Proud Member: CCFR, CSSA, OFAH, NFA.

  10. #19
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    depends where you are and where you live. i flushed 8 on my walk to my sitting spot for coyotes. should have just brought the shotgun.
    in sudbury a few years back there were lots. buddy came down for the deer hunt and gave me a bunch.

    i wonder in some areas if its habitat loss and growing numbers of other critters.

  11. #20
    Has too much time on their hands

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    At our camp in 82a not as many as 10 years ago but if I tromp around for 3 or 4 hours I will flush 6 to 8.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

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