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Thread: Snowshoe Hares

  1. #11
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    I was out on Sunday in wmu 60. Walked a good deal through the bush. Saw some tracks, no hares. I did see a couple grouse, an owl and a good amount of pine grosbeak. Might give it a go up north in a week or so.

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  3. #12
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    Since I've cleaned up all the yotes I've noticed more. But they seem to be mostly nocturnal on my cameras.

    Hard to find them without a dog.

  4. #13
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    cant speak to snowshoes as i dont see alot down here these days but cottontails ive shot a couple so far this year.
    tasty buggers

  5. #14
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    [Since I've cleaned up all the yotes I've noticed more.


    A proof known to many open minded hunters-that predator control is needed.

    See the other thread about non financial incentive for predator control.
    Thank You Bushwacker

  6. #15
    Has too much time on their hands

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    I've given up on trying to predict cycles. 2 years ago my main hare spot had decent numbers, but last winter it was totally devoid of sign. Yet I went in there last weekend and sign was again plentiful. It also doesn't take a lot of hares to make a lot of sign.
    "What calm deer hunter's heart has not skipped a beat when the stillness of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?" -Anonymous-

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Articcat View Post
    Oaknut it doesn't matter if they breed or not there cycle will determine how plentiful they are.
    As I mentioned earlier there seems to be a lot in our area also this year and we hunted them hard for the last 15 years up in Muskoka
    I can believe in a cyclical population up to a certain point. However, if 90% of the hoppers are removed by predation or hunting over the course of a winter, year after year, the population will still remain low. If only 30% of the population is removed the population will grow and spread. It's not as if every 7 years there is a mass die off, the cyclical idea was brought up by the predator prey relationship and how fast predator colonies rise and fall when prey is abundant or lacking.

    Judging by the skeletal remains scattered about my property I'm assuming the wolves tend to favor killing the winter deer herd rather than chasing down all the rabbits like they do in areas without a winter deer population.

    Sent from my SM-G973W using Tapatalk
    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

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