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Thread: Butcher Price Eastern Ontario

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by js4fn View Post
    Yup several butchers can farm out for a slaughterhouse
    I know one guys butcher was so busy he just bugered a whole beef imagine going to pick up your meat and itís. 800lbs of burger
    Now that is something else-showing up for meat,and get 800 lbs of burger.
    What the butcher was thinking anyway?

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  3. #42
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    I think you may have told me that before, good to know he got off. But I still find it disturbing that the neighbour was a rat, none of his business it was food.

    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    The guy in Carlsbad Springs was friend of mine - Mark Tijjsen. He beat the MNRF and sued them. But it would have been a 10k or so fine if he'd lost. Not only did the neighbour rat on him, he also allowed the MNRF to set up a sting operation in his kids treehouse overlooking Mark's yard. MNRF also trespassed when he was at work to take pictures for evidence - no warrant.

    The difference with a deer is that no one would make a business out of it. Instead of drawing the line around what's a business and what is sharing with friends, the MNRF draws the line between wild and domestic animals, as well as the rule about meat leaving the property. I think the letter of the law is actually 20kg limit, not that none can leave.

    My thoughts are that the laws are not that unreasonable, but the enforcement is *always* completely botched by MNRF people with some sort of Napoleon complex. These regulations are supposed to be based on voluntary compliance, not criminal charges being laid, except where there is refusal to comply. That's how they work with the big meat plants - if inspectors find something non-compliant, they work with the business to resolve the issue. With individuals, the first approach is to lay charges.

  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikePal View Post
    If I remember correctly, he only confirmed if it was for my own consumption..
    I don't know if that would fly anymore, anything that goes through the doors has to be inspected and approved.

    Most butcher shops now have to fully close to be able to take in wild game, no contamination and in some areas (back home) the butcher we had used would no longer do anything that contained a single wild game bone due to contamination, they would only grind and make sausage.

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    Now that is something else-showing up for meat,and get 800 lbs of burger.
    What the butcher was thinking anyway?
    The butcher will do whatever they were told. I know someone who decided to turn a whole side into ground, I offered to trade the ground off my half and the round steaks and roast into ground as well but they refused. They literally turned rib eye steaks and filets into ground beef because that is all the ate.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by js4fn View Post
    First part of inspection is the animal has to walk into slaughter house itís first inspected on the hoof
    now Iíve had vet give emergency permission to slaughter then rushed to butcher broken leg
    Not sure if the regs have changed in the last 40 years regarding "emergency kills".
    Where I worked in the early '80s in high school, the vet at the farm could "inspect" the animal, and then the farmer could truck it to the slaughterhouse. If it was on our regular kill day, the inspector would have a look at it too. If it wasn't on our regular kill day, we'd process it, hang it in the cooler and the inspector would have a look at the sides on the next kill day and stamp them. The vet would give the farmer a sheet of paper which we would attach the the beef in the cooler. The inspector would keep that paper when he stamped them . For the vet approved emergency kills, if the animal couldn't walk, we'd shoot it on the truck and winch it inside. You could never get an emergency kill for an animal that looked sick or emaciated. It had to be some sort of physical injury.

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