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Thread: The Witness Mark

  1. #1
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    Default The Witness Mark

    I see the muzzle loading section is quiet again that in a way is inviting some posting.

    I often wonder how many actually apply this method to their ML activities. For me using a SML this approach is essential to avoid a possible disaster. A witness mark basically confirms if the bore has some form of a load present. The witness mark is usually placed on a ramrod. In my case I have another method that works well. Regardless a witness mark is an ally to protect from a possible mishap.

    In the field there are no real distractions but before I load, I still stick the ramrod into the bore. When it sits flush with the muzzle, Iím good to load. At the range is another story when other people are present. Someone always seems to want to talk or ask questions when you are in the middle of loading. Then when you are done chatting and get back to loading you need to re-orientate yourself as to where you left off. A witness mark tells the story.

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  3. #2
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    Very wise info I was distracted once at the range and the mark on the rod told the story ,but I also went one step futher when in DOUBT DUMP IT OUT . When I started this sml adventure I you tube it and some of the video scared me , but I havent looked back

  4. #3
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    Overtheir

    When I first started out with the SML experience I didn’t feel fear but apprehension of something going wrong by doing something wrong that would cause a calamity. But that apprehension was overcome by using a strict loading procedure at the range to start with. Also carefully loading and identifying my vials of powder. Another practice I use is working only one weight of bullet at a time per range outing. By doing so there’s a less chance of a mix-up.

    My motto is “When it doubt check it out” before firing.

  5. #4
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    I don't but I should. I use pre-formed pellets in my "blackpowder" muzzle loader, and I always use 2, so it's pretty easy to tell when you haven't used the correct number of pellets or something isn't right. Anyway, I suppose it would be easy to mark the ramrod with a bit of white paint or something just to be safe.

  6. #5
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    Scared may be poorly chosen word I used extra caution paid more attention to detail

  7. #6
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    Whatever you do, Don't look up savage smokeless muzzleloader accident pictures LOL

    Sent from my SM-G781W using Tapatalk
    "If guns cause crime, all of mine are defective."

    -Ted Nugent

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rf2 View Post
    I don't but I should. I use pre-formed pellets in my "blackpowder" muzzle loader, and I always use 2, so it's pretty easy to tell when you haven't used the correct number of pellets or something isn't right. Anyway, I suppose it would be easy to mark the ramrod with a bit of white paint or something just to be safe.
    I do mark my ramrod,using 2 3/Seven pellets-and boy oh boy,did it help.
    Once i forgot the powder(not a biggie)just pain to take out the projectile,and once i loaded 2 bullets one on top of the other(ouch)not sure what would be the outcome,shooting 2 x 50 gr 3/7 pellets ,and trying to push out 2 Shockwave bullets at once..............

  9. #8
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    Because there was a mention of Savage SML barrel failure I felt a clarification is needed here.
    All barrels are susceptible to failure if their designed max pressure is exceeded. In the case of the Savage SML a pressure that exceeds 120,000-PSI could well rupture the barrel. Their barrels are hardened and tempered for strength. You would have to do something really foolish to rupture a Savage SML barrel.

    In most cases shooters have bulged their barrel by reaching a certain pressure that just resulted in a pooched barrel. By keeping bore pressure under 40,000-PSI you are shooting in a very safe range. Some have asked if there is any indication of possible high pressure developing? If you are seeing bulged primers shooting from a clean BP and proper sized vent that might be a wakeup call. The primer is not fully seated in the BP and the bulge occurs in the area that is not fully seated.

    With all that I’ve learned about the 10ML-II, following a loading procedure and employing a witness mark I feel quite comfortable shooting my 10ML-II.

  10. #9
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    Thanks, worthwhile and doesn't cost anything.
    Hope to get the ML out again soon, haven't used it in a while.
    "Only dead fish go with the flow."
    Proud Member: CCFR, CSSA, OFAH, NFA.

  11. #10
    Has all the answers

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    I have the ramrods marked with strips of electrical tape. Offers ease of removal if re-adjustment is necessary .......


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