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Thread: Researchers find tsunamis on the Great Lakes

  1. #1
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    Cool Researchers find tsunamis on the Great Lakes

    Let's see.... not just fishing related, duck and other hunting too.... boating & some cottages.... seems like a good place for it. Every year you hear of people dying for stupid stunts, ignorance or carelessness, I've seen waterspouts and big waves and lightning..... but tsunamis. It has happened on the Great Lakes.


    https://www.mlive.com/weather/2016/0...amis_on_t.html
    New research has found the Great Lakes may have a type of tsunami after all. They are not tsunamis caused by earthquakes. These tsunamis are caused by organized areas of thunderstorms.

    Big waves produced two deadly incidents in Holland and Grand Haven in the early 1900s.
    • Fourth of July, 1929: 10 died in Grand Haven when a 20 foot wave hit and buried the pier, and strong rip currents carried people away from shore. The wave came after an early morning storm.
    • July 13, 1938. Five died when a 10-foot wave hit during a calm day on at Holland State Park. In the past, researchers have said that water pushed toward Wisconsin after two days of powerful east winds barreled back westward, sweeping people off the Holland beach, pier and boats.

    The term meteotsunami first originated in the Mediterranean Sea, where these big waves are common. There the meteotsunamis can grow up to 27 feet tall.
    Last edited by mosquito; May 6th, 2022 at 11:33 PM.

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  3. #2
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  4. #3
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    Another phenomenon is called a “seiche”

    Seiches are typically caused when strong winds and rapid changes in atmospheric pressure push water from one end of a body of water to the other. When the wind stops, the water rebounds to the other side of the enclosed area. The water then continues to oscillate back and forth for hours or even days. In a similar fashion, earthquakes, tsunamis, or severe storm fronts may also cause seiches along ocean shelves and ocean harbors.

    https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/seiche.html

    Sometimes when a seiche happens on Lake Superior, water will get pushed up the Nipigon River and submerging the docks in the marina. The events can lead to confusion and speculation that the hydro dams upstream have failed. Other people mistakenly believe that seiches are tides… which don’t occur except on the oceans.
    Last edited by Sam Menard; May 7th, 2022 at 09:02 AM.
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  5. #4
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    When i was younger i remember an incident on lake erie near dunnville. Due to a strong offshore wind, the water in the area went down over 5 feet. So much water was blown out that my brothers and i were able to walk on the lake bottom and were able to pick up loaded shotgun shells that had been dropped by waterfowlers in the area. That lasted about 4 hours before the water came back up and filled the bay again. Probably one of the Strangest things i’ve ever seen on the lakes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    When i was younger i remember an incident on lake erie near dunnville. Due to a strong offshore wind, the water in the area went down over 5 feet. So much water was blown out that my brothers and i were able to walk on the lake bottom and were able to pick up loaded shotgun shells that had been dropped by waterfowlers in the area. That lasted about 4 hours before the water came back up and filled the bay again. Probably one of the Strangest things i’ve ever seen on the lakes.
    I saw the same on simcoe but not as much only a foot an a half. Was fishing the south end canals when it looked like the lake was draining only lasted about 15 minutes and the water came back to normal.

    Sent from my SM-G975W using Tapatalk

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    I experienced a seiche while camping on an island on Lake Nipigon in south bay. The 600m stretch of water between the island and the main shore literally turned into rapids for about 40 mins, then reverted to normal. Thought I'd had too many Canadians at first!

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