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Thread: What your preferred climbing method

  1. #11
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Quote Originally Posted by newbiehunter View Post
    Yeah TreeHopper steps are really stable and comfortable, I use the instead of a platform at hunting height. However their strength is the same their weakness - those extra flaps don't allow them to pack well in a pouch.(been thinking about switching to squirrel steps for this reason)

    In regards to a chair, you might want to look into this one:
    https://www.amazon.ca/Trekology-YIZI...s%2C179&sr=8-5

    It's more on expensive side, but weight, packability and comfort can't be beat. (if you pull a trigger on it, get an extra mat for ground, so you can use it on soft surfaces too)





    Sent from my moto g(8) power using Tapatalk
    I was debating the Squirrel steps ,and decided for TreeHopper.
    Mostly due of the size/width of the steps(steps seem comfortable ).

    For me the "bulk"is not an issue,i always carry a backpack(most my hunting stuff+parka +crossbow case)are in it.
    I never wear my parka until i am up in the tree,and start to be cold(I hate overheating).
    Them 5 steps will fit in nicely,i think.

    Thanx for the heads up for the nice chair.

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  3. #12
    Post-a-holic

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    For a semi permanent tree stand I use three strap-on steps and three step aiders each adding two steps which gets me up about 15ft, I add a safety line instead of using a linesman's belt to increase speed. For one day mobile hunts on public land I use the one step method with a five step aider and I can go up as high as I want but going up is very slow, for this method I use the tree loop on my saddle. Both methods I can rappel down in 30 seconds.
    Grant Mountain Bloodhounds Clementine Burgermeister TD, MiSAR
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  4. #13
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Summit Viper with a machete and hatchet on my belt to remove limbs on my way up.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

  5. #14
    Borderline Spammer

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    Any new stands made now are permanent, with a really solid ladder built and attached to get into them. I like putting the base of the ladder in deck blocks just to keep them from rotting. Do have one I built in a maple tree that is a little over 20' up, and gives an amazing view over a soft maple swamp, but age as well as knowing our limits has stopped us from building them that high.
    John

  6. #15
    Getting the hang of it

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    on a mobile set up I prefer 4 sticks, bottom stick has a 2 step aider and a hangon stand. this is the only way I can achieve 22' platform height.
    I'm probably switch to a saddle this year and see how that goes

    and yes 22' isn't always needed but it's certainly nice to have it when needed

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnjyb View Post
    Any new stands made now are permanent, with a really solid ladder built and attached to get into them. I like putting the base of the ladder in deck blocks just to keep them from rotting. Do have one I built in a maple tree that is a little over 20' up, and gives an amazing view over a soft maple swamp, but age as well as knowing our limits has stopped us from building them that high.
    John
    I am with John when it comes to treestands and have two built into the crotch of Maple trees at different locations on my property. I use 2x6's for support beams (lag bolted to tree) and 2x4's for safety rails plus the ladder is PT 2x4x16 built like they do on construction sites bolted onto the stand and pegged at the bottom. I also have two metal treestands for the younger guys to use. At 66 years old I prefer something user friendly and is big enough in a pinch you can fit two people. I plan on adding one more permanent stand but finding the right tree(s) in the right spot is tricky.
    Good Luck & Good Hunting !

  8. #17
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    I have a couple hang-ons with pegs that are pre-hung in good spots. But primarily hunt mobile with 3 aluminum hang-on stands, and 8 32" sticks. I'll hang & hunt with 2 or 3 sticks and an aider. If I find i'm in a good spot that i'd like to hunt again, i'll leave stand up and just take the aider and bottom stick back out with me. Trick is, remembering to bring that 1 stick when I end up going back there I can do that in 3 locations before I have to resort to using my climber.
    I'm not interested in saddle hunting solely based on my theory that there is no possible way I could ever shoot as well from a saddle, as I do standing on a level platform. I suppose if I were shooting a xbow or even a compound that might be different.
    Stands.JPG xop.jpg
    Last edited by LowbanksArcher; March 21st, 2023 at 01:42 PM.
    A trophy is in the eye of the bow holder

  9. #18
    Getting the hang of it

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    Quote Originally Posted by LowbanksArcher View Post
    I have a couple hang-ons with pegs that are pre-hung in good spots. But primarily hunt mobile with 3 aluminum hang-on stands, and 8 32" sticks. I'll hang & hunt with 2 or 3 sticks and an aider. If I find i'm in a good spot that i'd like to hunt again, i'll leave stand up and just take the aider and bottom stick back out with me. Trick is, remembering to bring that 1 stick when I end up going back there I can do that in 3 locations before I have to resort to using my climber.
    I'm not interested in saddle hunting solely based on my theory that there is no possible way I could ever shoot as well from a saddle, as I do standing on a level platform. I suppose if I were shooting a xbow or even a compound that might be different.
    Stands.JPG xop.jpg
    I'm guessing hunting with traditional archery equipment really changes your shot options
    even hunting with a compound I can hold at full draw for minutes if needed not really an option for you

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanE View Post
    I'm guessing hunting with traditional archery equipment really changes your shot options even hunting with a compound I can hold at full draw for minutes if needed not really an option for you
    It definitely needs to happen faster, and closer. And i'm about 10ft lower than you. lol. I stay under 12ft to improve my shot angles, and that's especially important when i'm expecting to shoot less than 15 yards. Last fall's buck was about a 9 yard shot, and I think I was only up about 10ft. If i was up 22ft, not sure how that would've worked out for me. My comment about the saddle is strictly due to shooting traditional. If I was taking my compound I would totally give a saddle a try. I've experimented with rigging my linesmans loops on my harness up to act as a saddle and hanging back while on my stand. My biggest dislike was the movement that was required to transition my 62" recurve with a 31" arrows sticking out of it, to the offside to make a shot. As I was experimenting a had a couple bucks come thru on my off side and I had to lift the entire bow/arrow over top of my tether to get to the offside. It was like I was waving to the deer. haha. Didnt like that. That said, it would be easier with a 30"-34"ata compound, and with a bit of practice i'm sure you will get the hang of it.
    A trophy is in the eye of the bow holder

  11. #20
    Leads by example

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    Due to the collapse of the deer population in our area, I donít spend a lot time in a tree anymore. You can spend a long time in one without ever seeing a deer!

    When I was hunting from treestands, I had the option of using a self-climber, a hang-on, or ladder stands.

    For the hang-on, I have screw-in tree steps and the sectional tree ladder. Tree steps are more portable but itís a workout screwing in 12 of them. Hauling a steel tree ladder into remote areas is no chore either, same goes for ladder stands. I donít really care for ladder stands as I like to be higher in a tree.
    A true sportsman counts his achievements in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport. - S. Pope

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