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Thread: Mange?

  1. #1
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    Default Mange?

    Capture.jpgThis coyote has a narrow tail-is it a sign of mange?

    There is another one in front of that coyote-has full tail
    Then shortly another younger coyote follows them. Healthy tail also.

    Mange is contiguous?How "badly"it is spreading...
    Is it spreading also on dogs...perhaps what else?
    thanx
    Last edited by gbk; March 27th, 2023 at 09:23 PM.

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  3. #2
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    Apparently Bears can get it, though I believe it’s deferent than the type dogs get. Not sure about in Ontario, was hearing a biologist from Arkansas talking about bears there getting it. Yes it is contagious, it comes from mites that live on the dogs. Yes dogs can get it but I believe that’s fairly rare.
    Last edited by hunter06; March 28th, 2023 at 06:52 AM.
    They say the only good wolf is a dead wolf, If thatís the case than Iíve reformed many a wolf.

  4. #3
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    I would be careful near that. As far as i know there are two types of mange Demodectic and Sarcoptic. Sarcoptic mange is contagious, in humans its referred to as scabies.

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    Would also say a coyote with absolutely no hair is one the creepiest things you will ever see.

  6. #5
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    I've got squirrels in the back yard with mange.
    " We are more than our gender, skin color, class, sexuality or age; we are unlimited potential, and can not be defined by one label." quote A. Bartlett


  7. #6
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    My brother-in-law is a trapper and he has caught a few wolves with mange. One was almost had no fur.
    A true sportsman counts his achievements in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport. - S. Pope

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbk View Post
    Capture.jpgThis coyote has a narrow tail-is it a sign of mange?

    There is another one in front of that coyote-has full tail
    Then shortly another younger coyote follows them. Healthy tail also.

    Mange is contiguous?How "badly"it is spreading...
    Is it spreading also on dogs...perhaps what else?
    thanx
    As it spreads amongst the coyote population it is one of nature best cures for reducing coyote numbers. I imagine the MNRF would even rate it superior to bullets for reducing the coyote population as it runs top to bottom through their pecking order.

    You don't stop hunting becau8se you grow old. You grow old because you stop hunting.
    - Gun Nut

  9. #8
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    This one is the worst I have ever seen (taken about 3 yrs ago)..... It ain't pretty and my understanding is, it can be passed on to dogs but with the right meds it can be easily treated.

    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  10. #9
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    Nature’s way to keep the wolf and coyote populations in check.
    A true sportsman counts his achievements in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport. - S. Pope

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Menard View Post
    Nature’s way to keep the wolf and coyote populations in check.
    Must be working as just got back from a run with the dogs. Surprised to find a cottontail under every clump of shrubs. Haven't seen so many in years.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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