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Thread: 18 month old Lab still chews his blankets ?

  1. #1
    Leads by example

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    Default 18 month old Lab still chews his blankets ?

    As the title says, he loves to chew his blankets or of course his chew bones , leaves everything alone for the most part. He has a stash of firewood he likes to play with outside. He was gifted to me about 7 months ago and I'm lucky to have a thrift store nearby so blankets are cheap but I wonder about this becoming a bad habit or will he grow out of it ? We live a fairly laidback lifestyle and he uses his kennel willingly or as needed but I recently rolled up a newspaper to swat a fly and when he seen that in my hand he tucked tail and ran out of the room. I suspect someone may have disciplined him that way when he was younger ? I use 3 tones when dealing with him; the soft baby talk for his cuddle time, the normal run of the day voice for the most part and of course for discipline or immediate action my louder, deeper barking commands type voice which he knows means I'm not happy with whatever he was doing but it does bring him to attention and he behaves. Sometimes all I have to do is give him "The Look" and he knows.

    So ? Will he grow out of it or does he have an anxiety issue ?
    Good Luck & Good Hunting !

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  3. #2
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    I don’t see anxiety here, I see boredom.

    If the blanket chewing is taking place in his kennel …..the easy solution ….. Stop putting blankets in his kennel until he learns a blanket is not a “chew toy”. Ensure he has something else to “play” with instead of a blanket.
    Last edited by Dakota Creek; August 27th, 2023 at 04:56 AM.
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  4. #3
    Leads by example

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    Could be boredom. Sometimes the weather isn't conducive to play time and sometimes I have to kennel him to get work done around here as I'm on a 50 acre farm with a regional road out front and leaving him unsupervised is a no-no. Now that we are getting cooler temps I can increase the retriever training so that may help. I did remove the blanket but make sure he has his Nylabone always available. It's been 14 years since I had a puppy and should dust off my training books as I remember one main quote " Training a dog is easy, training the master is the hard part".
    Good Luck & Good Hunting !

  5. #4
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    I agree with others, labs get bored easy. I'd agree with the rolled up paper though, seems like someone has used that before. sounds like your voice levels are good and she listens. My girl really doesn't like it if I use my loud voice, she will stop what she was doing and come right to me and cuddle as to say I'm sorry.

  6. #5
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    Sounds like you have a good working dog. As other stated boredom, or lack of work, is the the most likely cause. Pick a hunting style you enjoy doing and teach the dog how to particpate in that activity. IMHO, dont let the dog chew wood as the splinters get in the gums.
    National Association for Search and Rescue

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota Creek View Post
    I don’t see anxiety here, I see boredom.

    If the blanket chewing is taking place in his kennel …..the easy solution ….. Stop putting blankets in his kennel until he learns a blanket is not a “chew toy”. Ensure he has something else to “play” with instead of a blanket.
    Good advice.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marker View Post
    Sounds like you have a good working dog. As other stated boredom, or lack of work, is the the most likely cause. Pick a hunting style you enjoy doing and teach the dog how to particpate in that activity. IMHO, dont let the dog chew wood as the splinters get in the gums.
    My vet - well, my dog's actually - recommends sticks as the best dog teeth healthcare tool. Softwood though, not hardwood.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    My vet - well, my dog's actually - recommends sticks as the best dog teeth healthcare tool. Softwood though, not hardwood.
    Good to know, thank you.
    National Association for Search and Rescue

  10. #9
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    The baby talk isn't helping things. Dogs don't understand baby talk.

    Keep your command voice consistent.

    Treat the dog like a dog and not a human unless you enjoy bad behavior.

    Labs need daily off leash runs to get that energy out. If I don't exercise my chocolate daily, she gets extremely annoying...

  11. #10
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    The team I was on used the Kocher method, this included positive verbal commands and also negative verbal commands. For example, a positive verbal command would be 'good dog' spoken at a high pitch or a noise like a bird chirping when the dog did part of its training successfully. A negative verbal command could be saying "BARK" loudly (yes a person would say BARK) or a noise that sounds like a buzzer which is used when the dog gets distracted by something like a squirell, the negative command could be done at increasing volume depending on the situation. Hounds respond well to both positive and negative commands, they can be very perceptive to human emotion.
    National Association for Search and Rescue

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