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Thread: Venison Bone Broth Idea

  1. #1
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    Default Venison Bone Broth Idea

    Unfortunately not a recipe but more of a "what do you think?"

    Currently the only broth that I get to save is when I roast and then place a venison neck in a slow cooker all day to make some pulled venison (Best way to remove ALL the meat from the bones).

    But I have been thinking about making a broth at the same time as butchering. What do you all think about taking a turkey fryer (propane burner and large pot) tossing in larger bones (legs mostly) with a couple onions and celery/carrots and letting that rip for a few hours while we continue to butcher and wrap the meat?

    Leave it in the garage to cool overnight and skim the fat off the top and jar the remaining broth?

    Love using the broth in stews and soups and anyways I can use more of the animal I'm down for it.

    Any input or ideas would be great!

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  3. #2
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    Sounds pretty good to me, would you cut the bones with a saw to expose the marrow?

  4. #3
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    I usually process all broth during butchering too

    Cut bones to smaller chunks
    Oven roast them a bit
    Then throw in large pot
    Simmer for 12 hours with a bit of salt and vinegar (no spice or veggies)
    Once cooled,
    fill the ice cube trays (got larger ones from dollar store - about 40g each cube) and freeze
    Once frozen, transfer to large zip lock bags and back to freezer

    When time comes to cook, pull out as many cubes as i need and season broth according to given recipe

  5. #4
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    I was thinking of doing exactly what newbiehunter does.

    I was thinking of definitely cutting the larger bones to expose the marrow for a more rich broth and then a quick roast in the oven.

    However I think Id probably add in veggies (carrots, celery, onion) for more of a soup base/stew base. and then hopefully large jars and freeze.

  6. #5
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    We create broth from any animal bones we have: deer, bear, turkey, duck, grouse, goose, chicken, pork, squirrel, whatever. When you have a meal that has bones in it, just chuck them into a freezer bag and save them up until you have enough to fill the slow cooker. If you don't have time while butchering, put the bones into a plastic bag (zip-Loc makes xxl bags) and chuck them in the freezer until you do have time. You will get the best broth by going low and slow. I know we are making broth here but remember the expression "a boiled stew is a spoiled stew". Use a slow cooker if you can (cut or break bones to fit) and go for 6-8 hrs (overnight). Otherwise, a big pot simmering but just barely. Add carrot, celery, onion, bay and salt. Leave black pepper out as it can become very bitter if cooked for too long, add it before serving. Glass jars can crack in the freezer when the liquid inside expands as it freezes. We use large plastic yogurt or margarine containers and leave enough head space for expansion when freezing. Plus, the shape of those containers means you can get the broth out while it's still frozen.
    Last edited by Pioneerfreq; November 14th, 2023 at 07:03 AM.
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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneerfreq View Post
    We create broth from any animal bones we have: deer, bear, turkey, duck, grouse, goose, chicken, pork, squirrel, whatever. When you have a meal that has bones in it, just chuck them into a freezer bag and save them up until you have enough to fill the slow cooker. If you don't have time while butchering, put the bones into a plastic bag (zip-Loc makes xxl bags) and chuck them in the freezer until you do have time. You will get the best broth by going low and slow. I know we are making broth here but remember the expression "a boiled stew is a spoiled stew". Use a slow cooker if you can (cut or break bones to fit) and go for 6-8 hrs (overnight). Otherwise, a big pot simmering but just barely. Add carrot, celery, onion, bay and salt. Leave black pepper out as it can become very bitter if cooked for too long, add it before serving. Glass jars can crack in the freezer when the liquid inside expands as it freezes. We use large plastic yogurt or margarine containers and leave enough head space for expansion when freezing. Plus, the shape of those containers means you can get the broth out while it's still frozen.
    I'd like to do a large batch which is why I'm thinking large pot and outdoor propane burner. Luckily I'm off for a few weeks after our hunt so if we are successful I will have lots of time to make broth (and smoke meat). Other then that I feel like everyone is on the same page!

  8. #7
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    Good ideas, I will try.
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  9. #8
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    I've started making it pretty well every year. My advice would be make sure there is a bit of meat on the bones if you are going to roast them beforehand - I found if it was clean bone it had an unappealing flavour once finished. The last batch I did I left more meat on than usual and simmered for 6ish hours with onion and celery. Pulled the bones and then stripped the remaining meat off and made a batch of soup using that meat.

  10. #9
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    a pressure cooker cuts the simmering time down ( usually 2-3 hrs), and doesn't break down the collagen

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