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Thread: Charge TM batteries without Shorepower

  1. #1
    Getting the hang of it

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    Default Charging TM batteries without Shorepower?

    Planning a trip up to Temagami this summer but trying to figure out how to charge my trolling motor batteries after a day or two of fishing as there isn't shore power where I will be docked..

    Usually I use the Noco 4 bank charger to do the work for my two starting batteries and two group 31 trolling motor AGM batteries..

    Any ideas or suggestions to avoid taking the boat out of the water every two days for a night of charging with the Noco?
    Last edited by Winterfisher; March 11th, 2024 at 07:05 AM.
    "A bad day in nature is still better than a good day at work"

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  3. #2
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Borrow or rent a small generator.

  4. #3
    Travelling Tackle Shop

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    At White Lake last spring Paul and I both had electrics to troll with, I attempted to charge my battery with a 100 watt solar panel and Paul brought a small generator. The generator won out, but the electrics weren’t that good of an option;
    1. You have to keep adjusting your speed as the battery wears down
    2. A Group 31 battery is only good for about 5 hours of trolling.
    I went to my dealer and ordered a an F6 Yamaha 4 stroke and am currently looking for a 4 bladed prop for it. I’m also having my gas line from the built in tank spliced so I can run the 6 hp direct off the main tank.
    A bad day hunting or fishing is better than a good day at work.

  5. #4
    Getting the hang of it

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    Thanks guys,
    I had thought about solar but I know they just dont have enough power to charge fully after I would get in after the day..

    I'm lucky that my batteries actually last me a good 6-7 hrs on high speeds with my boat but can last 2+ days depending how I use it (usually on half speeds).

    I would love to put a little kicker on the back but just not in the cards this year.. I guess the best option for me is going to be pull it out of the water every 2 days and charge over night at the campsite.
    Running a generator down by the water in the boat doesn't sit right with me as I like peace and quiet and dont want to make any more noise than i need too
    "A bad day in nature is still better than a good day at work"

  6. #5
    Getting the hang of it

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    The more i looked at this I found Jackery power Stations.. Apparently the 2000W system would run my Noco 4 bank charger for a maximum of ~3 hrs IF it is pulling full draw at all times. would get a decent charge out of it.

    Unfortunately the cost of the jackery power stations is quite high
    "A bad day in nature is still better than a good day at work"

  7. #6
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Im not sure what kind of motor your boat has but mine when I had it had a built in alternator to charge or keep charge a trolling motor battery.
    "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, Teach a man to fish and he eats for the rest of his life"

  8. #7
    Getting the hang of it

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom gobble View Post
    Im not sure what kind of motor your boat has but mine when I had it had a built in alternator to charge or keep charge a trolling motor battery.
    Its an 05 90HP Merc.

    But my trolling motor batteries are at the front and totally isolated from the two rear house/starting batteries.
    "A bad day in nature is still better than a good day at work"

  9. #8
    Post-a-holic

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    You could charge the TM batteries off the starting battery and run a battery selector switch when the gas motor is off, a relay could be installed for added protection to prevent the starting battery from discharging when the gas motor is off in case you forget to turn the switch. Alternatively you could take a small inverter/generator with you on the boat so it charges the TM batteries as you use them.

    The first option would require installation of wires and controls, the second option would not require installation but is more costly.

    Neither is optimal, shore power is the best option.
    Last edited by Marker; March 14th, 2024 at 12:38 PM.
    National Association for Search and Rescue

  10. #9
    Getting the hang of it

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    the more I look at the system I think I may go the route of a jackery power station. Small enough to top up the batteries after a day of fishing is all i need it for and they charge in 2 hours.
    "A bad day in nature is still better than a good day at work"

  11. #10
    Leads by example

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    I hear what you’re saying about the peace and quiet, but these little 1800W inverter generators run so quiet when the draw is low that I think it’s an option to consider….and you’d have another toy
    “You have enemies ? Good. It means you have stood up for something, sometime in your life”: Winston Churchill

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