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Thread: how long does a salt block last

  1. #1
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    Default how long does a salt block last

    I was going to put out some salt this year for deer.

    I notice that you can get tiny ones (4lbs) and large ones (44lbs) for about the same money, the larger ones of course are more plain than the small ones.

    Question: How long do they last (small vs. large).

    I am just wondering if I put out a 44lb block, am I good for the whole season, or should I expect to be putting a new one in place every week... every month... ???

    Do the small 4lb blocks tend to get lost (I could see a deer just picking it up in it's teeth and walking away with it). so same question, do they last a week, month, full season?

    Any hints on usage (on the ground, on a rock, put on a piece of plywood... or perhaps on a dinner-plate with a knife and fork on either side and a softly burning candle?)

    Thanks!

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  3. #2
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    In my experience, the large blocks last almost a full year. This will vary depending on how much exposure to rain the block gets.
    I generally put the blocks on any large fallen logs that are in the area because the salt soaks into the log and allows the salt lick to be active even after the block has dissolved. If there are no large logs in the area, I just put them on the ground. The salt will also soak into the ground and the deer will dig a pit there, but I don't find that the salt lick will be active for as long after the block dissolves compared to using a log.
    Last edited by rf2; September 2nd, 2014 at 03:27 PM. Reason: clarification

  4. #3
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Quote Originally Posted by scarkner View Post
    ... or perhaps on a dinner-plate with a knife and fork on either side and a softly burning candle?)

    Thanks!
    Can see this going along the lines......How much wood can a Woodchuck chuck if a Woodchuck could chuck wood?

  5. #4
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    Put down 10 Kg blocks last fall, one was gone in 5 months, the other just on tail end now. Moisture in the ground, rain exposure, wildlife usage all have an impact, I think its safe to say a 44 pounder will easily last a year unless its getting flooded all the time. You don't say how your going to get it to the lick site, if your packing it that can have an impact on your selection.

  6. #5
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    Go with the big boy, that way you don't have to worry about it for a long while (10-15 months). As stated above anything that will soak up the salt is the best, I'd say an old stump is #1 but they will still come to lick/eat the dirt where a block was.
    Heeere fishy fishy fishy fishy! Hidden Content

  7. #6
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    I put one of the big ones out this spring and it has barely dissolved in 4 months. Since I plan to put another one out next year, I cracked it up a bit to get more of it dissolved into the mud. I I could definitely expect to see that thing lasting till next spring if it was whole.

  8. #7
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    Awesome responses!!!

    Thanks for your input. I don't have to carry the block too far and there are a number of boulders and rocks in the area I can set it on. Good to know that they last so long.

  9. #8
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    let me see salt licks, feeding, baits, food plots etc. Heck why not put up a high fence? Its called hunting, not herding. It was not that long ago when even putting apples out was baiting and illegal. though one could argue that calls and decoys are baiting. But I disagree, outside of electronic calls, it takes talent to actually use them and decoys can spook as well as attract. Scents too, take some sort of experience and skill to attract. just putting out scent does spook them. But when you start putting out salt licks, and deer feedng, this actually changes the feed patterns of the deer.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfhunter View Post
    let me see salt licks, feeding, baits, food plots etc. Heck why not put up a high fence? Its called hunting, not herding. It was not that long ago when even putting apples out was baiting and illegal. though one could argue that calls and decoys are baiting. But I disagree, outside of electronic calls, it takes talent to actually use them and decoys can spook as well as attract. Scents too, take some sort of experience and skill to attract. just putting out scent does spook them. But when you start putting out salt licks, and deer feedng, this actually changes the feed patterns of the deer.
    I'm not aware that baiting deer in Ontario was ever illegal.

    Salt licks won't change deer feeding patterns - so you've mixed apples and oranges here - food plots and bait piles - I concede will though.

  11. #10
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    yes, it was,in fact a friend got charged in 1989 for baiting. He paid a 250 dollar fine and his license was suspended or 2 years. All he did was put a bunch of apples out close to his treestand. My cousin in the late 90's, was also charged when he was using deer cocaine. It may be legal now, but is it moral or ethical? Also when do you seperate baiting from feeding.

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