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Thread: regulations for crow

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Just clean them up by picking them out of the field and leaving them in a place that is out of sight of people and the raccoons and others will take care of the rest for you.
    Now if you are getting YOUNG crows I have heard you can eat them. I don't think they would be much different then Rooks baked into a pie...You know the song 4 and 20 twenty black birds( meaning crows, rooks, brown head, and red wing) baked in a pie?
    Many years ago OOD mag ran a recipe for black bird pie. I think they used red wing black birds. It raised quite a stink and they got quite a few letters from people claiming you couldn't shoot them because they were a song bird. I would think that if you thought the bird was feeding more on crops like corn and less on dead animals then it might not taste too bad. Wish I still had that issue of the magazine.
    Get ready, Take 'em

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by shorst97 View Post
    Many years ago OOD mag ran a recipe for black bird pie. I think they used red wing black birds. It raised quite a stink and they got quite a few letters from people claiming you couldn't shoot them because they were a song bird. I would think that if you thought the bird was feeding more on crops like corn and less on dead animals then it might not taste too bad. Wish I still had that issue of the magazine.
    How about this one:




    Black Bird Pie

    Ingredients:

    3 1/2 cups self-rising flour
    1 cup very warm water (almost hot)
    Directions:

    Mix little biscuit dough. Knead 'til tough and dry - roll with rolling pin 'til very thin and cut into 2-inch strips.

    (Clean birds according to information posted under recipe)
    BIRDS:
    25 black birds well covered with water
    3/4 lb. sausage (link) - optional

    Cook until tender (at least 2 hours or 1 hour for chicken). Salt and pepper to taste. When black birds are tender, keep broth at a rolling boil and drop in pastry - piece by piece, shaking pot constantly to keep pastry pieces separated. When all is in pot, place cover on and let cook for approximately 10 minutes. Let set for about ten more minutes. Then eat.

    If you are unfamiliar with making pastry from scratch, you can substitute canned biscuits (roll individually with rolling pin). Or buy frozen pastry from bakery. If you use canned biscuits, let set for one-half hour and roll or flatten again to thinness desired.




    Game Birds:

    Game birds offer the most varied and perhaps the most delicious wild meat. Ranging from the rich, tangy flavor of the miniature woodcock up to a magnificent wild turkey or Canada goose, they provide a range of flavor delicacy as wide as the variation of the sport in hunting for them. The quality and flavor of game birds, however, depends to a very large extent, on the care they receive after the hunter has bagged them.

    The simple rules to follow are these: The birds should be drawn soon after they have been shot. The body heat should be allowed to cool as quickly as possible. The birds should be kept cool or at cold temperatures until they are to be cooked. Game birds should be bled, cleaned and cooled quickly after shooting. And as you clean them, be sure to remove the oil sacs at the base of the back near the tail. Also be sure to carry a portable ice chest to speed cooling and to protect the birds from spoilage during the trip home.

    When testing game birds to determine those which are young and tender, the stiffness of the bill is usually significant. If pheasants and grouse, for example, can be lifted by the lower jaw and nothing breaks, they are mature birds whose james are set. They will not be as tender and will require more cooking than the younger, less developed.

    Game birds should be skinned if only the breast will be used or if they are tough and will be used in stews or casseroles. Otherwise, the birds should be plucked. This helps keep the meat more moist and tender.

    Be sure you remove any shot pellets and cut away any badly shot up areas. Cut off the wings and feet of small birds with shears. Then, cut small birds up the backbone, remove the lungs, wash and drain.

    Cut larger birds into pieces, the same as you would a chicken. You'll also find the livers from medium and large-sized birds are big enough to save and will taste very similar to chicken livers.

    Here's another hint. Freezing a bird for a week or two will help tenderize it.

    NOTE about DUCKS: In the fall, ducks usually have fine- flavored meat, and any stuffing can be used with them. At other times of the year, they may be more strongly flavored and are improved by soaking the cleaned birds for 2-3 hours in fairly strong salted water to which 1 tsp. baking soda has been added. If ducks prepared this way are to be kept under refrigeration for a few days, after wiping them dry, put a few slices of onion in the body cavity. This will help remove the excess gamey taste, and the onion is to be discarded before the ducks are cooked.

    However, like all game birds, ducks should be allowed to hang at a temperature just above freezing for at least 48 hours before they are cooked. The length of time and temperature at which they are allowed to hang beyond that period will control how "high" or gamey they are allowed to become. This should be determined by personal taste.

    When preparing game birds, you can cook young birds by broiling, roasting, or in any of your other favorite recipes. But older birds should be stewed or braised to tenderize them. Or if you wish, you can try a commercial tenderizer. Just sprinkle the tenderizer in the body cavity of the bird and let the bird stand in the refrigerator. The amount of time the bird needs to remain in the refrigerator depends on the size of the bird. For example, a large bird such as a turkey, will need 12 to 24 hours for the tenderizer to work.

    If you're not sure how many servings you'll get from each bird this may help you: *1 serving = 2 quail, 1-2 squab, 2-3 doves, or 1 small duck. *You can figure on at least 2 servings from 1 pheasant or 1 large duck. *A 4-6 lb. goose should feed 4-6 people.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    They cause a lot of damage, it's not that they have low numbers.. Just find a roost and TRY to count the number of birds that come in... There is a reason that a group of crows are called a "Murder of crows". They have been known to kill lambs, calf, and fawns while ewe, cow, or doe is giving birth.
    Next to the raven they are considered the smartest bird. Very intelligent, cunning and destructive. There are some great videos on people working with them. They say if you get one as a chick and slice they're tongue they can talk like a parrot!

  5. #24
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    Sorry for bringing up an old thread everyone... I'm interested in doing some crow hunting. On page 15 of the 2015 Ontario Hunting Summary it states:
    "A small game licence tag also permits you to hunt Americancrow, brown-headed cowbird, common grackle, house sparrow,red-winged blackbird or starlings and other animals notscheduled under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997(e.g., groundhogs)** "

    Is my interpretation of this correct in crows being open all year as long as the hunter has a small game license obviously?
    Sorry for a dumb question.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ollie View Post
    Sorry for bringing up an old thread everyone... I'm interested in doing some crow hunting. On page 15 of the 2015 Ontario Hunting Summary it states:
    "A small game licence tag also permits you to hunt Americancrow, brown-headed cowbird, common grackle, house sparrow,red-winged blackbird or starlings and other animals notscheduled under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997(e.g., groundhogs)** "

    Is my interpretation of this correct in crows being open all year as long as the hunter has a small game license
    obviously?
    Sorry for a dumb question.
    Yes, mine too.... good to go at least down here in southern Ontario.... and no dumb questions, only dumb responses...
    Last edited by fratri; July 21st, 2015 at 10:18 PM.
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  7. #26
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    yes you may hunt crows all year in Ontario Dutch

  8. #27
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    Thanks guys.

  9. #28
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    This is my way as well. TSC has a Owl Decoy on sale this week. Dollar store crows set up around owl decoy does have an effect on the crows aggression. The next day you hunt over crow bodies for coyote, if anything is left from overnight.
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Don't forget the Owl decoy. A "dead" crow decoy sitting on the ground in front or hanging under if the owl is on a post/tree/stump.
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Nepean, for 2019, Chairman - Ontario Libertarian Party

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dutchhunter View Post
    yes you may hunt crows all year in Ontario Dutch
    So does this mean you can hunt any small game without a licence in all of Ontario all year round? Or does it mean you can't?

    A small game licence tag also permits you to hunt American crow, brown-headed cowbird, common grackle, house sparrow, red-winged blackbird or starlings and other animals not scheduled under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997 (e.g., groundhogs)**.

    This licence is not valid in northern Ontario and part of central Ontario from June 16 to August 31,

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wahoo View Post
    So does this mean you can hunt any small game without a licence in all of Ontario all year round? Or does it mean you can't?
    You can hunt crow all year long in Ontario with a valid small game license but in some areas of Ontario the small game license is not valid in Northern Ontario so therefore in some areas of Northern Ontario you cannot hunt anything that requires a small game license during this time.

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