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Thread: Delta Waterfowl vs Duck unlimited

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by boilerguy2412 View Post
    Have you ever been to the prairies to see how much land Ducks Unlimited owns out there. They do so much conservation work. I don't understand how anyone who is somewhat informed can't see all that they do for ducks. Ducks Unlimited isn't a organization that is for preserving hunters it's for preserving waterfowl and habitat. I think every waterfowl hunter should donate either there time or some extra funds for organizations like Delta and DU.
    Ummm, yeah, I have been west and seen what DU has done out there, and I've seen some respectable projects here in Ontario as well. I've supported both organizations to the tune of several hundred dollars a year for as long as I can remember. What I said was DU Canada, which was once an organization created by hunters for hunters, has dropped the hunting image like a hot potato in exchange for a politically correct image of being a naturalist group. All you need to do is look for any significant hunting related content on their website or magazine to see that.
    "Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours." John Locke
    In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is.

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  3. #12
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    I`ve volunteered for Du for about 3-4 years now. They have set up a few ponds in my area and since that... nothing... I do agree that they do a great deal for the Prairies.... my only concern is that the money we pour into the DU goes all to the Prairies and not to the northern part of Ontario. But all that being said, never seen anything about Delta out here either... but at least the Du has started something.
    A bad day fishing is always better than being on the couch!!

  4. #13
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    Hey guys 25% of money raised at a Delta banquet stays right in the chapters territory and the committee decides how it will be spent! Good luck doing that with other organizations. Delta has been the lead on the Canadian Outdoors Network, DU wouldn't touch that one. Also Delta's Canadian head office is in a strip mall in Winnipeg. They don't need a taj mahal like others. A question that always bugged me was why DU won't support ALUS, I thought that would be right up their alley.
    For every dollar spent on conservation by a nonhunter, eleven dollars are spent by a hunter. Seems like the right thing to do would be to promote hunting eh?

  5. #14
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    I do agree that they do a great deal for the Prairies.... my only concern is that the money we pour into the DU goes all to the Prairies and not to the northern part of Ontario.
    DU put the money where it will do the most ie. prairie pot hole region as that is wher most ducks are produced , sorry to say but northern ontario according to studies producess few ducks in comparison .

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandwagon View Post
    Seems to be the false perpsective of DU not supportive of the hunting group and I am not sure where this is coming from?
    Agreed. Just had the Kingston DU Sportsman's dinner recently. Hunting videos and hero shots on the big screen all night. Shooting skeet next door just before the event. Not hunter friendly?

    Yes, they also have a lot of "fat cat" aspects, but that's true with most non-profits. The money and the land for conservation are important to the cause and we all benefit from the donations of those with larger bank accounts.

    To me, the (overgeneralized) way to frame Delta and DU: DU conserves land for the sake of increasing production and preserving natural habitats. Delta develops the science that will increase production and improve management on those lands and others. Both are necessary. Without the land, the science is useless and visa versa.
    Last edited by Dead Ringer; May 21st, 2013 at 11:00 AM.

  7. #16
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    To the original poster - any questions you have pertaining to DUC volunteer opportunites in your area please feel free to PM me here OR by a_laidley@ducks.ca As G Buck mentioned, we always have room on the Port Perry committee for new members - closer to your home I can put you in touch with the manager for that area

    I'll do my best to address everything that's been raised

    Conservator - the Fall issue is now completely directed towards hunters. The other three issues speak more to accomplishments and legacies on the conservation, science and policy fronts.

    DUC partners with The Canadian Tradition to produce four/five waterfowling episodes per season that feature waterfowl hunting across Canada, DUC's conservation programs, the employees that deliver them and our volunteer base that passionately raise the funds required to deliver the programs.

    scud_17 - thanks for being a DUC volunteer. Last year DUC spent well over $150K just south of you rehabilitating the 1800 acre Hilliardton Marsh project (550 of it is wetlands). This area is of great signifigance to migrating waterfowl originating from James Bay as they stage here. It is also provincially significant for mallard and black duck production.

    The money raised by our chapters in Ontario stays in Ontario. It is not sent west. Our trained engineers and qualified biologists spend it in the areas with the greatest need and in areas where we can leverage multiple matching funds through programs such as NAWCA from US based partners such as the USFWS and state based wildlife agencies.

    In Ontario we have enrolled almost a million acres into conservation programs and there are well over 2000 projects; most on land held by private land owners. I see the biggest differences between our programs and the ALUS program is the length of the commitment and the payment structure. We are spending money raised by volunteers and they demand that we invest it with the most bang for their buck (our board of directors and our President are all unpaid volunteers). When we go out and do a project we look for a minimum 25 year commitment from the landowner and when possible it is incorporated into the deed should the land transfer ownership. Many projects these days are done as perpetual easements ensuring that the conservation project will be around forever. Having over 2K conservation projects on the ground also involves a lot of maintenance and behind the scenes use for funds too such as rehabilitation and repair, trapping (yes trapping), site monitoring (water control devices, wetland draw downs, nest box structures; installation, monitoring, maintenance).

    The ALUS contract that a famer signs is for 3 years. With fluctuating commodity prices I could see where farmers could opt out when prices are high - they're running a business which is understandable. They are also paid an annual incentive - in order for this program to grow new and more funds have to be secured every year. I'm a professional fundraiser and know first hand how tough this is given the current economic climate. When we spend money it's a one shot deal with something concrete to show - ALUS seems like a revolving door and without huge input sums from entities such as government it seems unwieldy - look at what's going on with CRP in the States - tightened government purse strings coupled with high commodity prices; the program is seriously going backwards.

    To borrow the first line from Delta's site on "Why Delta?"

    The decline of duck habitat and the continued loss of duck hunters are arguably the two greatest challenges facing our waterfowling heritage.

    Without habitat there are no ducks - without ducks there is no duck hunting.

    DU Canada was founded by duck hunters that realized that the decline in wetland acreage was directly related to the decline in duck numbers.

    Most of my volunteers hunt or their spouses hunt. They know that the key to it all is wetland conservation. They raise the funds required and turn them over to qualified professionals who in turn make science based decisions on where to best invest that money IN Ontario.

    BTW - did you know that the projects that DUC owns can often be accessed for hunting with a phone call to the local office? When I head west in the fall a simple call to the local office grants me permission to hunt a lot of great potholes and marshes.

    Did you know that DU Canada is a major partner with Delta Waterfowl in the rehabilitation of the Delta Marsh?

    (DUC's headqaurters are at Oak Hammock Marsh) Why would a waterfowl organization want to be headquartered in a strip mall as opposed to the shores of a heritage marsh? A wetland that was completely rehabilitated and is now a thriving example of good stewardship. Our headquarters also partners with the Province of MB to host an interpretive centre where people can learn about the importance of wetlands and touch and feel it first hand. One of my co-workers has a hen mallard nesting on their window ledge at the marsh - I would think it's hard to get those sensations in a strip mall.

    Personally I feel the biggest difference between the two organizations is the diversity of DUC's members. Hunters and non-hunters alike respect the fact that 88 cents of every dollar that is raised by DUC goes directly into the core mission of wetland conservation and this benefits hunters and non-hunters alike. Broadening the support base translates into access to more funds which equals more wetlands which equals more ducks which equals better duck hunting.

    I'm a duck hunter and I really like shooting ducks - this coming Fall will be my 36th season. I've been a DUC member for 27 years and a volunteer for 17 (employee for 8). I take a lot from this great resource and giving back through DUC is a perfect fit for me as it provides tangible, visible returns on my investment.


  8. #17
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    Hey Stubble that was a well written response. I disagree with some of what you wrote, but that's ok. But please address the reason DU won't or hasn't joined the Canadian Outdoors Network. I do think DU is trying to gain hunters favour again which is good.

  9. #18
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    What is the Canadian Outdoors Network? Please enlighten me - what do they do, what is their mandate?

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    The Canadian Outdoors Network is the country's first and only national coalition for hunting, fishing trapping and shooting sports. The network is comprised of 28 outdoors groups representing 500,000 members. The national coordinator is Dr. Robert Bailey, who doubles as Delta Waterfowl's vice president of policy.
    The network came together in 2007 to challenge Resolution 42. This was a proposal from the Liberal Party to ban all semi automatic firearms in Canada. That first conference call brought the fledgling Network together. The collective lobbing pressure eventually resulted in Resolution 42 being dropped.
    Other issues successfully tackled by the outdoors network.
    -challenging a proposal to dismantle the Canadian Wildlife Service
    -challenging a proposal to redirect Federal Duck Stamp revenues into environment Canada's general budget, potentially diminishing financial support to waterfowl management.
    -challenging proposed amendments to the Navigable waters Act, which could severely restrict access to traditional hunting, fishing and trapping areas.
    - Was extremely pivotal in getting the long gun registry repealed.

    It is the goal of the Outdoors Network to make sure all Canadians understand the concerns of outdoor enthusiasts from coast to coast. An entire life style depends on it-Bob Bailey.
    "United we have a future" "Divided we have none"
    Members include

    Alberta Fish and Game Association
    Alberta Outdoors Coalition
    BC Wildlife Federation
    BCWF Wildlife Federation
    BCWF Political Action Alliance
    Canadian Institute for Legislative Action
    Canadian Section of the Wildlife Society
    Canadian shooting sports Association
    Delta Waterfowl Foundation
    Fur Institute of Canada
    Friends of Fur
    Hunting for Tomorrow Foundation
    Long Point Waterfowl
    Manitoba Wildlife Foundation
    NWTF
    New Brunswick Wildlife Federation
    Newfoundland and Labrador Wildlife Foundation
    Northwestern Ontario Sportsmen's Alliance
    Nova Scotia Federation of anglers and hunters
    PEI chapter of Delta Waterfowl
    PEI Trappers association
    PEI Wildlife Federation
    Ruffed Grouse Society
    Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation
    Yukon Fish and Game Association
    Federation Quebecoise des Chasseurs et Pecheurs
    Canadian Sporting Arms and Ammunition Association

    I hope this enlightens you Stubble.

  11. #20
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    Great post Stubb's! Some more good things I did not know about DU and even more great reasons to continue supporting those who support us!

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