Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Roadkill Doe????

  1. #11
    Just starting out

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Hey,

    Thanks to all that responded to my query. Only managed to salvage half of her, the good half. But I may aswell eat her instead of the yote's. The carcass will be strategically placed, if ya know what I mean.......lol

    Anyways, she's about to get froze again.........except for a couple steaks.

    Thanks again,

    Brian

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement
    ADVERTISEMENT
     

  3. #12
    Needs a new keyboard

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Harder to skin but easier to cut up while frozen unless your deboning that is .

    TD

  4. #13
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    In general, you can keep a dead wild animal or bird you have found or been given.
    In some cases, you need to register that you have a dead wild animal in order to keep it.
    This rule applies to certain:

    • large mammals (e.g., black bear)
    • birds of prey (e.g., bald eagle)
    • furbearing mammals (e.g., coyote)

    Registration

    You don’t always need to register the possession. The process depends on:

    • the type of wild animal
    • how you acquired it

    If you need to register, you register for what’s called a Notice of Possession – this allows you to keep the dead wild animal for personal use.
    You cannot sell dead wild animals under a Notice of Possession.
    Source law

    This is a summary of the provincial laws. You can find a complete set of rules related to this activity in:

    • Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997
    • Ontario Regulation 666/98 (possession, buying and selling of wildlife)
    • Endangered Species Act, 2007

    Species at risk

    Special rules apply for endangered or threatened species. You can only keep a protected species under very limited circumstances (e.g., for scientific and education purposes).
    Protected species are listed on the Species at risk in Ontario list. Please contact a local Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) office for more information about the rules.
    Species at risk in Ontario list
    Find an MNR district office
    When you need to register

    Large mammals

    This group includes:

    • black bear
    • white-tailed deer
    • moose
    • American elk

    Yes, you need to register an animal

    If you:

    • find the wild animal dead (e.g., road kill)
    • are a landowner or wildlife agent protecting property who has lawfully killed a black bear

    No, you don't need to register an animal

    If you:

    • lawfully killed it (e.g., with the appropriate hunting licence)
    • receive it as a gift from someone who lawfully killed it
    • lawfully possessed it before its death (e.g., in a licensed zoo)
    • are a taxidermist or butcher possessing it in the course of your business

    What's a wildlife agent?
    Raptors (birds of prey)

    This group includes:

    • bald eagle
    • peregrine falcon
    • northern goshawk
    • gyrfalcon
    • northern harrier
    • American kestrel
    • American swallow-tailed kite
    • merlin
    • osprey
    • turkey vulture
    • certain hawks (broad-winged, Cooper’s, red-shouldered, red-tailed, rough-legged, and sharp-shinned)
    • certain owls (barred, boreal, burrowing, eastern screech, great gray, great horned, long-eared, northern hawk, northern saw-whet, short-eared, and snowy)

    Yes, you need to register a raptor

    If you:

    • find it dead (e.g., found road kill)
    • are a landowner or wildlife agent who has lawfully killed it protecting property

    No, you don't need to register a raptor

    If you:

    • receive it as a gift
    • lawfully possessed it before its death (e.g., in a licensed zoo)
    • are a taxidermist possessing it in the course of your business

    Furbearing mammals (and their pelts)

    This group includes:

    • beaver
    • bobcat
    • coyote
    • fisher
    • fox (Arctic, red)
    • lynx
    • marten
    • mink
    • muskrat
    • opossum
    • otter
    • raccoon
    • red squirrel
    • striped skunk
    • weasel (least, long-tailed, short-tailed or ermine)
    • wolf

    Yes, you need to register a furbearing mammal

    If you:

    • find it dead (e.g., found road kill)
    • are a landowner or wildlife agent who has lawfully killed it protecting property
    • buy or otherwise acquire or import the pelt of a furbearing mammal, or the carcass including the pelt, for your own personal use

    No, you don't need to register a furbearing mammal

    If you:

    • lawfully killed it (e.g., if you are a licensed trapper or small game hunter)
    • lawfully possessed it before its death (e.g., in a licensed zoo)
    • are a taxidermist or butcher possessing it in the course of your business

    How to register/get a licence

    Step 1: Download the Natural Resources Registration Guide

    • print a copy or
    • open the guide in a new window or tab

    Natural Resources Registration Guide
    Step 2: Create a ONe-key ID and Natural Resources client profile

    You need a ONe-key ID and a Natural Resources client profile to register online. ONe-key is a secure account that gives you online access to Ontario government programs and services.
    Once you have a ONe-key ID, you will be asked to create either an individual or business profile for Natural Resources registrations. Create:

    • an individual profile to register non-business activities
    • a business profile to register activities conducted by a:
      • business
      • non-profit organization
      • municipality
      • government agency
      • ministry

    Open a new window or tab to:
    Create an individual profile
    Create a business profile
    If you already have a ONe-key ID:

    • sign in to ONe-key
    • confirm your Natural Resources profile

    Open a new window or tab to:
    Sign in as a returning individual
    Sign in as a returning business
    Step 3: Register an activity

    • select My Services from the main menu
    • click on Create New Registration
    • select Notice of Possession from the registry options
    • register the activity
    • submit the registration

    Step 4: Receive confirmation

    • receive an official Confirmation of Registration by email
    • keep a copy as proof of registration
    • registration is free

    If you can't apply online:

    • download the registration form and user guide
    • print, complete and mail the form
    • wait for confirmation

    Notice of Possession form and user guide
    Buy, sell or give wildlife

    In most cases, you cannot buy or sell game wildlife or specially protected wildlife, whether alive or dead, without permission.
    Some rare exceptions exist (e.g., selling a pelt as a licensed trapper).
    For more information, please contact a local MNR district office.
    Giving as a gift

    You can give a dead wild animal or bird as a gift, if you acquired it under the rules in this article.
    Updated: December 4, 2013

  5. #14
    Elite Member

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roe+ View Post
    Skinning will be a chore, but it's good meat hopefully.

    Roe+
    You are right on there Roe+. It's a cold slow job. Make sure you don't take any of the bruised meat. It really won't taste very good. The rest of the meat will be fine.
    Dan O.
    Last edited by DanO; January 22nd, 2014 at 09:15 PM. Reason: clarification

  6. #15
    Has all the answers

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Nice work Gilroy.

  7. #16
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roper View Post
    Nice work Gilroy.
    X 2 ,. I had an osprey done , lots of legwork, but well worth it.

  8. #17
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    X3.
    Thanks Gilroy.

    FMc Ive wondered about birds of prey, had the impression you needed written permission to have one mounted.

  9. #18
    Member for Life

    User Info Menu

    Default

    JBen..I found a Screech Owl hanging in my chicken coup netting about two years ago. Posted a pic here and one of the guys wanted to get it mounted. All I had to do was go to the MNR Biologist, he identified it, filled out a from and handed me a copy. I then stuck it into a box with the Owl and mailed it the taxidermist in Kingston...all went smoothly.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  10. #19
    Has all the answers

    User Info Menu

    Default

    You do need a licence to keep road kill. The licence is free but you need to apply for it. It can be done online or mail in the form. I believe it is called a notice to posses road kill or a dead animal.

  11. #20
    Needs a new keyboard

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Goosesniper View Post
    You do need a licence to keep road kill. The licence is free but you need to apply for it. It can be done online or mail in the form. I believe it is called a notice to posses road kill or a dead animal.
    No, no no, it's not a licence! It's just a report form they send back to you in the mail authorizing possession. They (MNR) will ask time/date/place and any other pertinent info such as MV accident or otherwise.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •