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Thread: Our deer will soon be in trouble with this winter!

  1. #11
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    I have been keeping an eye on a pack of three timber wolves this winter in WMU 49. I noticed that since the crust came they moved 4 miles from where they have been hanging most of the winter. There are no deer yards in this area, but a very large population of moose. I believe this small pack is specializing in moose hunting. Calves are up to their belly in snow now, and the wolves are on top.

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  3. #12
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    At my main deer spot I have a feeder going once a day at 3 pm to help. Plan to feed all year until March to help. Purchased some feed cheap at sail. Every little bit helps. Feeder is on a timer so only have to visit one every two weeks to refill.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbonura View Post
    At my main deer spot I have a feeder going once a day at 3 pm to help. Plan to feed all year until March to help. Purchased some feed cheap at sail. Every little bit helps. Feeder is on a timer so only have to visit one every two weeks to refill.
    You need to feed until new growth is up and the snow is clear and gone. This absolute worst thing to do is stop feeding at the end fo the winter when the deer have used up all their fat supply and new growth hasnt yet started. If a late winter storm hits you'll have doomed the deer which have become dependent on your help.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by blasted_saber View Post
    You need to feed until new growth is up and the snow is clear and gone. This absolute worst thing to do is stop feeding at the end fo the winter when the deer have used up all their fat supply and new growth hasnt yet started. If a late winter storm hits you'll have doomed the deer which have become dependent on your help.
    . Then that is what I will do. More than most who just write about. Early March we should be fine. Not much cost to feed they turkeys and deer.

  6. #15
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    canon cam 225.jpgcanon cam 237.jpg I feed here and since they are coming in regular they have made the decision to winter here . To stop now they would certainly die with these snows . I feed and keep feeding till new growth appears in April usually .

  7. #16
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    Been a tough winter for sure! Help your deer, shoot some yotes!

  8. #17
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    Be very careful on what you feed deer if you decide to start feeding them this time of year. You can do far more harm than good. If they've been living on browse for the past month or so and you introduce something like corn, you can kill the deer. Their stomachs might no longer have the proper enzymes/microorganisms to digest it, depending on your location. Do a little research on what is safe to feed with this time of year before you start.

    The best option is to provide easier access to natural browse. Drop a few cedars trees or at least the lower limbs that deer can't reach. The tops from other ice-damaged trees (depending on the species) might be helpful as well.

    I definitely agree with the OP's post, this will be a hard winter on the deer, just wanted to advise using caution if you decide to start feeding them in your area.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by blasted_saber View Post
    You need to feed until new growth is up and the snow is clear and gone. This absolute worst thing to do is stop feeding at the end fo the winter when the deer have used up all their fat supply and new growth hasnt yet started. If a late winter storm hits you'll have doomed the deer which have become dependent on your help.
    I have to disagree with that. It contradicts what most deer research indicates.
    The important part is to feed the deer early.
    They will usually quit eating supplemental feed by the end of January on their own.
    Deer usually leave the yards in mid to late march as snow melt permits loooong before their is any new growth.
    Deer won't starve to death because of one late winter storm - that assertion is just plain silly.
    Last edited by werner.reiche; January 31st, 2014 at 09:23 AM.

  10. #19
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    Wont get into specific details, no real point/value from me.
    Just can say I know someone in the heart of the Loring Deer yards. He starts the day after archery closes (Dec 15) and carries through around the end of Feb....depending on dozens of variables. But really is largely determined by them. No matter what he does doesnt do, they will start migrating out on their own.
    Last edited by JBen; January 31st, 2014 at 10:01 AM.

  11. #20
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    Another 10-20cm of snow forecasted for my area. Just made a bad situation worse. GW above has good advice. You have to be very careful how and what you feed at this point. The gut flora in the rumen cannot process certain foods (eg. pure corn, alfalfa-rich hay, etc).
    See http://www.wildliferesearch.ca/snow/...nservation.pdf for some good pointers. I remember the old days when MNR had money. I'd drive an Alpine with a dog sled, loaded with "Ministry Mix" (oat/corn ratio mix). We'd use expired hardhats from the JR camps as hoppers for the grain - just nail them to the trees. A lot of deer hunters aren't aware that you have to be awful careful when you're baiting in the fall too. Merely pouring a full 40kg bag of corn on the ground can be a death sentence for deer at this time too. They'll die of rumen bloat/colic, and an impacted rumen. I've shot deer that came from baited areas on adjacent properties that were totally impacted and bloated-up like a poisoned pup. I've to date found the coyote-scavenged remains of at least 6 fall deer now, that would have died from rumen impaction due to corn "dumping" by someone baiting. When I use whole corn in the fall for bait, I'm careful to only scatter about a coffee can of it every couple of days. That's all you need to keep them coming.
    Man, this winter is going to be one for the books. This latest dump of snow will put the Hindon 1 snow course's average depth over 100cm.

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