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Thread: What to do with stewing meat?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wired View Post
    Brown meat in frying pan with lots of onions and peppers (if you like). Salt and pepper to taste. After this is done add to skillet cream of mushroom soup (2 cans) 1/2 can of water, 1 can of mushrooms with juice. Simmer this till meat tenderizes. Serve over rice. You can change this recipe and add whatever you think would taste good to you.
    Wired, you actually just got my mouth to water at 0919 in the morning....
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  3. #32
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    Default What to do with stewing meat?

    I'd like to share the Newfoundland way of doing moose and seal. Many have heard of it but never tried it. I can tell you from first hand experience it is awesome. Back home a lot of people that I know bottled the entire moose. It has many advantages. 1. It preserves without freezing your prized game. 2. It's absolutely delicious. 3. It's very convenient. You can eat it out of the jar or heat it up. Your choice. 4. The day of bottling is usually with your buddies and ya get on a tear.

    I just recently had the opportunity to share a bottle of deer that I did this past fall to a local hunter that had never tried it before. He was amazed of the taste. His response was "you gotta get me the recipe". Some say it's the best they ever had. Certainly still continue to make the most of filet and back straps. Anything that is tougher meat save for the bottle. It will turn it into filet. Believe me. Here is the recipe that I took from the net. Any questions please don't hesitate to pm me. Cheers.
    This is traditionally the way we have been bottling moose meat for years. The recipe works great on venision as well.

    Boil and steralize your Jars and lids.

    Place a small cube of salt pork back fat into the bottom of each jar.

    Fill and tightly press/pack meat (cut up like stew meat) into your jars up to the top of the bottle's shoulder. (or bottom of the neck.

    Place another small cube of salt pork back fat on top of each jar.

    Add 1 tps of table salt to each jar.

    Our family doesn't use any other spices, but some like to add pieces of turnip, pepper and so-on.

    Put the lids on your jars and tighten the lids. Do not over tighten...your lids only need to be finger tight here and not wrenched down hard.

    Place your jars in a large pot and fill with water to the top of the necks of the jars. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat a little and let gently boil/simmer for 4 hrs.

    Remove the jars from the water and let the jars cool on a table. Within 10-15 mins you should start hearing the lids "pop" as they vacum seal themselves. Check each lid by pressing in the middle to make sure each lid is sealed.

    Jars of meat are best kept in a cool place such as a canning shelf in a basement, or in a fridge.

    I've known many who will open a jar and eat it like it is. personally, I like to dump a bottle in a pan and quickly heat and dump over mashed potatoes or rice.

    This recipe/method will take your toughest leather like moose or deer meat and make it soooo tender and tastey, you'll considering bottling your "whole" next deer. Some people don't like the look of the meat in the jars, but I assure you they have a different opinion when eating it after being heated.

    Enjoy... bottled moose Newfoundland style.
    Last edited by Goosesniper; May 28th, 2014 at 12:18 PM. Reason: spelling error

  4. #33
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    Try it as a curry... Awesome ... Kids love it

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosesniper View Post
    I'd like to share the Newfoundland way of doing moose and seal. Many have heard of it but never tried it. I can tell you from first hand experience it is awesome. Back home a lot of people that I know bottled the entire moose. It has many advantages. 1. It preserves without freezing your prized game. 2. It's absolutely delicious. 3. It's very convenient. You can eat it out of the jar or heat it up. Your choice. 4. The day of bottling is usually with your buddies and ya get on a tear.

    I just recently had the opportunity to share a bottle of deer that I did this past fall to a local hunter that had never tried it before. He was amazed of the taste. His response was "you gotta get me the recipe". Some say it's the best they ever had. Certainly still continue to make the most of filet and back straps. Anything that is tougher meat save for the bottle. It will turn it into filet. Believe me. Here is the recipe that I took from the net. Any questions please don't hesitate to pm me. Cheers.
    This is traditionally the way we have been bottling moose meat for years. The recipe works great on venision as well.

    Boil and steralize your Jars and lids.

    Place a small cube of salt pork back fat into the bottom of each jar.

    Fill and tightly press/pack meat (cut up like stew meat) into your jars up to the top of the bottle's shoulder. (or bottom of the neck.

    Place another small cube of salt pork back fat on top of each jar.

    Add 1 tps of table salt to each jar.

    Our family doesn't use any other spices, but some like to add pieces of turnip, pepper and so-on.

    Put the lids on your jars and tighten the lids. Do not over tighten...your lids only need to be finger tight here and not wrenched down hard.

    Place your jars in a large pot and fill with water to the top of the necks of the jars. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat a little and let gently boil/simmer for 4 hrs.

    Remove the jars from the water and let the jars cool on a table. Within 10-15 mins you should start hearing the lids "pop" as they vacum seal themselves. Check each lid by pressing in the middle to make sure each lid is sealed.

    Jars of meat are best kept in a cool place such as a canning shelf in a basement, or in a fridge.

    I've known many who will open a jar and eat it like it is. personally, I like to dump a bottle in a pan and quickly heat and dump over mashed potatoes or rice.

    This recipe/method will take your toughest leather like moose or deer meat and make it soooo tender and tastey, you'll considering bottling your "whole" next deer. Some people don't like the look of the meat in the jars, but I assure you they have a different opinion when eating it after being heated.

    Enjoy... bottled moose Newfoundland style.
    I will second this. I do my venison pretty much the same. I like to play around with it a bit though. Adding a couple drops of liquid smoke is great. A clover of garlic or a teaspoon of Montreal steak spice gives her a nice kick too. Next week I will try a bottle that I tossed a chunk of fresh horseradish into, cant wait. I do love me some horseradish.
    How is it one careless cigarette can cause a forest fire, but it takes a whole box of matches to light a campfire?

  6. #35
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    I have a couple of ways I do my stew meat when I get tired of stew or soup.

    1. Cut into cubes and marinade in a teriyaki or jerky marinade or beer and bbq sauce marinade. Wrap cube in a half slice of bacon and bake in the oven. Then try your best to keep you kids and friends from eating them all on you.

    2. using beef (or chicken) broth and curry, or the "smouldering applewood smoke bacon" la grille seasoning by club house, cook and reduce after browning the meat on very low heat and slowly reduce it down to a sauce that can easily be frozen and used on rice or in sandwhiches. When reheating try to use a pan on low heat so as not to dry it out too much.
    Get ready, Take 'em

  7. #36
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    Make stew

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark270wsm View Post
    take you tough meat and soak it in a pot with water all the way up so its above the roast. then ad 1.5 cups of vinegar, you can add a onion sliced and some garlic if you want .. put it in the fridge over night .. take out of pot rinse of with clean water and throw in oven with anything you like... it will be the best meat you ever had tender and different texture then deer meat ..
    That's quite interesting. Never heard of doing that before. I've heard of using vinegar to cut down on the flavor of strong meats, but this is a strong mix. Could you elaborate? Does the vinegar affect the flavor much?. What is the texture like? Stew meat tends to be all oddball sizes so I guess you could use any cooking method, right? Tia


    To the OP, here's what I like to do for something different with the better parts of what is labeled as "stew", which can be some nice cuts. I try and cut strips across the grain and then usually marinate for a few hours at least, depending on the cut. Then give them them a good coating of a Cajun coating mix and give them a quick hot fry in a butter oil mix and you have a great snack for entertaining, (or not lol), or even as part of a meal. It only takes 3-4 minutes at most to cook the meat and I've found that the plate doesn't tend to last long at all.
    The great thing about this is that it's so versatile. Change the game meat, change the marinade, change the coating and add your own spices. I'll even use my round steaks at times for this no prob.

    Cheers
    Smitty

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