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Thread: Over powering a boat?

  1. #11
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    Along with what others have said, overpowering a boat is one sure way to loosen rivets from pounding on the waves unless you back off on the throttle when cruising. That's where most leaky boats/rivets come from.

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  3. #12
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    I once went fishing with a guy that put a 60-65 HP Thunderbolt engine on a 14 ft. tinny probably only rated for 25 HP we sat on milk crates..my son and I and all the gear went far forward.The boat went stupid fast up on Turtle Lake felt like 100 MPH lmao Just do what you think is right and legal.
    We're all in this together ! :joker:

  4. #13
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    If it's an OMC 70hp motor, weight would not be an issue as I believe the OMC 60hp's and 70hp's of the era are bascially the same engine with perhaps different heads and carbs. As others have said, it is illegal to exceed the boats capacity (hp and load) and that is what is more likely to get you into trouble.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishFrenzy View Post
    There's a plate on your boat outlining max weight and HP - if you're over and the OPP check you while on the water, they can charge you. I've never had an officer check the plate, or ownership. I'm not sure what the consequences are though...

    FishFrenzy
    I have never heard such a thing, can you provide a reference to this please???

    I have a 14' Fiberglass boat with a 70hp Johnson on it. Came that way from the factory even though the rating plate says 50hp. Rating plates did NOT exist when the boat was made, so it was added after based on the length and beam calculations, even though the manufacturer felt it could take more (as evidenced by this being the standard motor at the time).

    Insurance is the biggest issue, I found a few companies that would insure the boat, but it is tough since it is over-powered. I do have insurance and therefore I am 100% legal. Boat has had no problems and I am careful how I drive it. Cost of the insurance isn't significantly higher, but I did shop around a lot.

    Happy to share the company name if you PM me. They seem "OK" to deal with, granted I haven't had a claim and that's always the real test of any insurance company.

  6. #15
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    By the way, here is a link to the proper minitstry of transportation horsepower calculator which takes into account many distance measures (beam, length, depth, angles)... but is not related to the weight of the boat:

    http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety...on4-1346.htm#3

  7. #16
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    I would not recommend this but I do know of one fellow who put a larger than recommended motor on a new Lund. In order avoid issues, he ordered a new set of factory decals for a lower horsepower variant of the same motor.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarkner View Post
    I have never heard such a thing, can you provide a reference to this please???

    I have a 14' Fiberglass boat with a 70hp Johnson on it. Came that way from the factory even though the rating plate says 50hp. Rating plates did NOT exist when the boat was made, so it was added after based on the length and beam calculations, even though the manufacturer felt it could take more (as evidenced by this being the standard motor at the time).

    Insurance is the biggest issue, I found a few companies that would insure the boat, but it is tough since it is over-powered. I do have insurance and therefore I am 100% legal. Boat has had no problems and I am careful how I drive it. Cost of the insurance isn't significantly higher, but I did shop around a lot.

    Happy to share the company name if you PM me. They seem "OK" to deal with, granted I haven't had a claim and that's always the real test of any insurance company.
    "Knowingly operating an unseaworthy vessel" which is a $500 fine and potentially a criminal offense. Canada requires the load plate to be on all boats in plain view - if you go over the max weight, number of passengers or horsepower they may deem your vessel to be unseaworthy.

    FishFrenzy

  9. #18
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    my brother has a 20hp on his 12ft. He can't even open it up with two people in it because its too fast and the bottom of the boat starts to flex at high speeds. I have a 10hp on my 14ft, He can pass me like I'm standing still LOL.
    "If guns cause crime, all of mine are defective."

    -Ted Nugent

  10. #19
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    Something to keep in mind, I can't remember what year the change came in, but older motors were rated at the powerhead while newer motors are rated at the prop. Or was it the other way around?
    Anybody have or remember the details?
    Speak out for Father's rights

  11. #20
    Getting the hang of it

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    I believe overpower a vessel is a big no no. The boat is rated by the NMMA and coast guard for maximum hps. You will run the risk of breaking rivets or welds and over time weakening the hull prematurely. On the water its always better to be safe then sorry.

    Henry

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