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Thread: .243 sight in for coyotes

  1. #21
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    From experience, MEASURE the exact height of the center of the bore to the centerline of the optic for the ballistic program "sight height."

    Then SHOOT at 200,300, etc. in order to validate YOUR rifle's drop data relative to the ballistic program drop data. Then generally(depends on program software) you can vary the muzzle velocity you enter and the relative drop vs the program's listed drop at varying distances in order to get the program data to MATCH your actual VALIDATED data. Now you have TRUED your dope and the drops will be exact for your different distances, WITH THAT RIFLE AND THAT LOAD.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by skypilot View Post
    From experience, MEASURE the exact height of the center of the bore to the centerline of the optic for the ballistic program "sight height."

    Then SHOOT at 200,300, etc. in order to validate YOUR rifle's drop data relative to the ballistic program drop data. Then generally(depends on program software) you can vary the muzzle velocity you enter and the relative drop vs the program's listed drop at varying distances in order to get the program data to MATCH your actual VALIDATED data. Now you have TRUED your dope and the drops will be exact for your different distances, WITH THAT RIFLE AND THAT LOAD.

    Yup the programs are nice....When I was learning to do it it was slide rulers and a lot of graph paper. Yes there where Calculators that could do the math faster but they cost a hundred of bucks at the time.
    I bought a calculator for karen to do her radio course a few years ago and the type she needed was still almost 200 bucks.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  4. #23
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    Sounds like too much work and too hard....lol
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  5. #24
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    They definitely cut down on the amount of math and the trial and error for most folk that don't have the opportunity to shoot frequently.

    They are also an easy way to see how environmentals affect POI.

  6. #25
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    I agree Snowwalker, I advise folk to run the data, true their data and make a book or data card to place on the firearm or scope covers.

    On the work/difficulty, it is somewhat time consuming initially however once is usually enough. Then it's simply double checking your original data routinely to verify how cleaning and throat/barrel wear/coppering affect your POI data.

  7. #26
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    Something we have to consider here when we give out all these suggestions on how/where to set our scopes , is that the majority of hunters [ not shooters ] are casual in their shooting , and are not reloaders that can tailor their ammo. to their needs.
    Software and computer programs to them are meaningless as they buy whatever ammo is available to them at the time and where they purchase it .
    Factory ammo from one manufacture to the next manufacture can vary considerably in velocity , also vary in velocity from one rifle to the next, this variance in velocity then affects point of impact.
    We all know that factory published velocities are never exact , and unless you have access to an chronograph, you are just guessing at what YOUR PARTICULAR RIFLE PRODUCES IN VELOCITY FROM THAT PARTICULAR ROUND.
    In some cases manufactures of ammo. use test barrels built to tolerances that are way above normal tolerances for most factory produced rifles available to hunters, a lot of these barrels are of 26 inches in length and the velocities from them are very rarely reached by most hunters rifles
    My point here , is that for the majority of shooters , decide what weight of bullet you want to shoot , try that weight from a few different manufactures , see which shoot the tightest group, [ at this time never mind where it shoots on the target you just want the tightest /smallest group ] then go out and buy several boxes of that particular ammo , then sight your rifle in with that ammo to shoot at whatever distance you decide, either a 100 yd. zero or 200 yd. zero .

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fratri View Post
    Sounds like too much work and too hard....lol
    It's grade nine math....You did graduate Junior high right?
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  9. #28
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    Sterlok is free.. plug in the factory info then go sight in.
    My 45grain .223 round says it is 3550 Fps... I just had to adjust the velocity in Sterlok to 3564 on the day I was shooting and the numbers and the real world matched up. Now when temp, elevation and stuff changes it gives me a very close match between numbers and real shooting.
    I can carry the infomation for all my rifles and all the bullets I may shoot. Did you know that my Federal .22 ammo hits 1 mil-dot apart at 100 yards when I am switching between 36 grain 38 grain and 40 grain high velocity? Just knowing lets me switch quickly without having to resight the rifle.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Sterlok is free.. plug in the factory info then go sight in.
    My 45grain .223 round says it is 3550 Fps... I just had to adjust the velocity in Sterlok to 3564 on the day I was shooting and the numbers and the real world matched up. Now when temp, elevation and stuff changes it gives me a very close match between numbers and real shooting.
    I can carry the infomation for all my rifles and all the bullets I may shoot. Did you know that my Federal .22 ammo hits 1 mil-dot apart at 100 yards when I am switching between 36 grain 38 grain and 40 grain high velocity? Just knowing lets me switch quickly without having to resight the rifle.
    Ah, it still seems like too much work/hard for me....

    but this is something my buddy at work probably does... He spends a lot of time fine tuning his gear, he is into long range shooting.... I remember the first time I went target shooting with him, he told me he was going to setup the gong for us. He started walking and after like 10 minutes I thought WTF....where is this guy going,... it turns out he put out a 400 yd gong... At that distance he looked small and the gong was barely visible with the naked eye. I thought he was pulling my leg but no....first shot he hit it... now that was impressive...

    For me a 200 yd shot seems far and is barely doing off my shooting sticks....so a 100yd zero and top of the back shot at 200-250yds max works for me...
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

  11. #30
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    I happen to have a Nikon Prostaff 5 on my 243 and this is the ballistics program I used to set up the scope. Works really well.

    http://spoton.nikonsportoptics.com/s...n.html#Index:4

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