Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Calling the Optimum Shot

  1. #1
    Apprentice

    User Info Menu

    Default Calling the Optimum Shot

    With muzzle loading it is usually a one shot deal for deer that will either put meat on the pole or get skunked with a possible cripple suffering for hours on end. The thought of having to deal with the latter is very unsettling to me as I have helped others retrieve their cripple from a poor shot.


    Iíve not only put hours in developing a well performing load under different temperatures but practicing free hand and with a shooting stick to see how well I can place my shot at varying ranges. I mostly still hunt in funnels and use a range finder to verify my distance to surrounding landmarks so when a deer comes around I got his distance tagged.
    The only thing left is waiting for a good angle to present itself and minimal movement of the deer. Should the deer come trotting through and a call doesnít slow it down to a slow walk or stop it gets a pass. Yes it can be a heart-breaker and utter frustration to let a real nice size buck pass. But instead of ending up with a cripple that may feed other predators you are allowing a chance for him to further spread his genes for a healthy population.


    Iíve been very fortunate to maintain a one-shot, one-kill record but not simply because of luck. Not losing a cripple is almost as satisfactory to me as making a kill. Hunting deer also provides a peaceful moment I canít find anywhere else. When my day is done there will either be a deer hanging on the pole or not with no regrets of my action for that days hunt.

    Learning how to make the call of an optimum shot starts at the range with developing your accurate load. Next step is the deerís position for making a good lethal shot. After that the work begins. This post is not about ethics but knowing real satisfaction when an optimum shot that gives you the highest percentage of a humane kill is utilized. Like anything in life how you accomplish something that satisfies a goal is Your Call.



    Ed

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement
    ADVERTISEMENT
     

  3. #2
    Getting the hang of it

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Great topic, and well worded. I feel exactly the same way. John.

  4. #3
    Elite Member

    User Info Menu

    Default

    I shoot all year round. I shoot all year round for a reason. 1. I owe it to the animals I hunt to humanely harvest them. 2. I enjoy the shooting sports. 3. Why not?

    I hear of too many stories of people who don't even confirm there zero's before a hunt. I heard one today where this fellow put a slug barrel on his shotty and went out for the controlled hunt. 4 deer later and not a hair touched....or wounded... He was asked if he had shot it prior to the season. He said it was good 5 years ago so no he didn't. FML some people should not be allowed to hunt. The gang he belongs to needs to sort his sh 1t out.

    I find the shooting sports to be the most relaxing past time there is. No pressure to do this or that.

    Just breathe, relax, squeeze.

    HA

  5. #4
    Has all the answers

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Not only muzzle loaders but all equipment used to harvest your game should be tried and tested, there's hunters and then there are wanna be hunters, like mentioned above, and just say good enough and head out to try and kill something, hopefully not them selves

  6. #5
    Apprentice

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Itís nice to hear from other operators of firearms that IMO is a good attitude and mindset for hunting. I would enjoy hunting with you as we have the same goals. Then at the end of the day the sharing of the dayís adventure that might generate a few laughs or reveal some good points to remember. Maybe even deer retrieval instead of scouring the woods looking for a cripple.
    Then as the day closes you are left with a feeling that ďLife is GoodĒ.


    Ed

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •