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Thread: 5 Reasons I shoot O/Us and Doubles in the Uplands

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustic View Post
    I've had a few high end O/Ugrades , problem is the thick stuff I hunt.
    I spend half the day just worrying about scratching or marking the wood LOL
    I solved that problem this year. Bought a lower grade AYA 16g SxS and shortened the barrels. It is now Cyl/Cyl and points like wand. Light and handy and I don't care if it gets scratched. Strictly my woodcock gun for the crazy covers I hunt. Shots are almost never longer than 25 yds so just the ticket. My "pretty guns" will get used in the more forgiving covers...lol.
    I 'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustic View Post
    I've had a few high end O/U 's , problem is the thick stuff I hunt.
    I spend half the day just worrying about scratching or marking the wood LOL
    Or you can bust through backwards and learn to shoot over your shoulder
    What calm deer hunterís heart has not skipped a beat when the silence of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?


  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninepointer View Post
    Or you can bust through backwards and learn to shoot over your shoulder
    You're a flushing dog owner eh......
    I 'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  5. #24
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    sxs are nice to carry and to look at, but, other than a bunch of English traditionalists, I've never heard of any serious shooter using a sxs. u/o is a completely different story. personally, I don't hunt anymore with u/o, but rather use a modern semi.
    the problem with the later is the safety aspect. nothing beats the ease of a hinge action; if it's open it's safe (something nearly everybody is able to grasp regardless what's going on in the field)

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waftrudnir View Post
    sxs are nice to carry and to look at, but, other than a bunch of English traditionalists, I've never heard of any serious shooter using a sxs. )
    They are hunting guns typically and not built to the same demands of sporting guns. Light to carry, very dynamic in handling. Don't know too many who would consider themselves "English traditionalists"myself included but many upland hunters choose the SxS.
    I 'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrym View Post
    They are hunting guns typically and not built to the same demands of sporting guns. Light to carry, very dynamic in handling. Don't know too many who would consider themselves "English traditionalists"myself included but many upland hunters choose the SxS.
    Maybe should have worded it differently. I know quite a good number of serious hunters who shoot SxS, but not one single (sport)shooter who would touch it with a long stick. SxS have their merits; i.e. looks and easy carry, but there are better options when it comes to shooting. I used to lug heavy U/O through the bush (because that were my "tools" at the time), but realized soon that hunting does not only consist of shooting. Now I nearly exclusively, use light semis (Rem and Auto 5 haven't seen any daylight for years).
    The problem with semis is not the gun, but WHO carries it. So, give me choice of what fellow hunters will carry, it were hinge actions (but I will keep my semi !)

  8. #27
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    I tried to like the semi but just couldn't. Used a Benelli Ultralight one season and found it just worried me with a dog around me, sold it after 1 season. Now when the dog is around I just break the double and all I have to think about is the dog and or bird he is carrying. Heavy sporting O/U are not the best tool for upland nor is a light double best tool for sporting games. You can play 18 holes of golf with an 8 iron only but there are better options.
    I 'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  9. #28
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    I still own one 12g semi ( SBE2) but for upland only use doubles. My problem is I'm a junkie and have collected too many of them....
    I know what you are saying, I would like to get one in every gauge.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrym View Post
    I like having 2 different chokes , the simplicity and safety of loading/unloading and being able to crack it open when walking.
    Quote Originally Posted by terrym View Post
    Wait until you walk through the woodcock jungle with a nice light and lively double.
    Seconded on both points. The break action is safer, especially when you have to bust through thick cover. A consideration when hunting woodcock with a flushing dog. And I will never worry about scratching anything -- partly because I shoot cheap guns, but also partly because if I ever bought a gun I was afraid to use, I'd turn around and sell it.

    Now, somebody will break out the tired old line that safety comes not from the gun but from the guy behind it. True to a point, but the design of the gun can make safe handling more convenient, or less.
    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waftrudnir View Post
    I know quite a good number of serious hunters who shoot SxS, but not one single (sport)shooter who would touch it with a long stick.
    You're right, and much as target shooting trends through history have run through virtually all the shotgun actions, I think the O/U has proven itself as the one to stay. It sure seems to offer an edge in a sport where one miss in 100 is the difference between a competitor and just another guy in the squad.
    What calm deer hunterís heart has not skipped a beat when the silence of a cold November morning is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?


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