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Thread: Eating clams - grand river

  1. #1
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    Default Eating clams - grand river

    When walking/fishing the grand river I see a lot of clams in the shallow, rocky sections. They are of course alive and healthy, often with their tongues (probably not a tongue) sticking out.

    Has anyone tried eating them?
    Chopped , breaded and fried/baked?
    Chowder?
    Or are they unedible?

    Thanks in advance for any knowledge you may impart.

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    I had to look this up, I hadn't thought of these since I was a kid (68/69) and took a bucket home for my Mom to cook. She told me they couldn't be eaten because the Grand river was far too polluted.

    Turns out they are endangered now.

    The Wavyrayed Lampmussel is a medium-sized freshwater mussel that lives in mainly gravely riffle areas in the middle reaches of the Grand and Conestogo Rivers. The female of this species has evolved a minnow-shaped lure that it uses to attract a host fish, the smallmouth bass. Clear water may be a critical requirement for successful reproduction and this may explain why the range of this mussel is becoming limited in southern Ontario.
    more info: http://www.ontario.ca/environment-an...yed-lampmussel
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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    Actually you shouldn't eat fresh water clams they are known to have what I think is called a Fluke.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

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    The wavyrayed lampmussel is not the clam I see in the grand river. These are clams, not mussels and look like a normal clam about 5 to 6 inches long. Oval shaped.

    MikePal - your mother may be right - the river may be too polluted, however I have eaten pickeral from this area and they taste good.

    Greatwhite - I'll look into "Fluke". thanks.
    Last edited by Roper; August 12th, 2015 at 02:41 PM.

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    Yes but fish eats bugs and fish, clams eat by filtering the water thus they carry a lot more contaminants (if present in the water of course). Never heard of this fluke?? please educate me
    The fishing was good; it was the catching that was bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trilynx View Post
    Yes but fish eats bugs and fish, clams eat by filtering the water thus they carry a lot more contaminants (if present in the water of course). Never heard of this fluke?? please educate me
    A fluke in the context above is a parasitic worm, go fishing in Maine and you will catch 'Fluke' a type fish related to Flounder, try to get a good mulitmeter and you will find Fluke electronics sells them, and if you want some trucking you could use Fluke transport. And that's a fluke (LOL).
    Last edited by Marker; August 12th, 2015 at 03:42 PM.
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    I took a survival course many years ago. The instructor suggested freshwater clams are edible but make sure the water isn't stagnant. He suggest we boil the clams then change the water and boil them some more. Them remove from the shell and pan fry in butter. Well how many things that are considered tasty would you boil twice. Exactly!


    I did try the process and I couldn't get past the very rubbery texture of the clam. They seemed tasteless as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanO View Post
    I took a survival course many years ago. The instructor suggested freshwater clams are edible but make sure the water isn't stagnant. He suggest we boil the clams then change the water and boil them some more. Them remove from the shell and pan fry in butter. Well how many things that are considered tasty would you boil twice. Exactly!
    .
    so I guess a proper survival kit includes a stick of butter ;-)

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    I saw a lady with a bucket of clams , at a northern lake. If I remember correctly , she put a handful of oatmeal in the water with them. This irritated them and they flushed any sand or crap out. Probably changed the water, and left them a while longer , before cooking. Don't know how they turned out. old 243

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanO View Post
    I took a survival course many years ago. The instructor suggested freshwater clams are edible but make sure the water isn't stagnant. He suggest we boil the clams then change the water and boil them some more. Them remove from the shell and pan fry in butter. Well how many things that are considered tasty would you boil twice. Exactly!


    I did try the process and I couldn't get past the very rubbery texture of the clam. They seemed tasteless as well.
    Thing is one will eat just about anything in survival mode where as day to day may pass on such thing. Once a friend of the family took me fishing as a kid. Pulled up to a sand flat on Simcoe dove in and brought up some clams. Don't remember eating them myself but he got the to eat. Not saying its a good idea but have seen it done.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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