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Thread: Hunting dog. Better to live outside in kennel or inside?

  1. #1
    Getting the hang of it

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    Default Hunting dog. Better to live outside in kennel or inside?

    I'm hearing conflicting reports. Does it matter? Or is one better than the other?

    a couple hunting friends of mine suggest that I could ruin the dog for hunting purposes if I have him inside with the family. They say the best hunting dogs are those left outside. Any input is appreciated.

    i just bought a lab puppy and was planning on keeping him inside. I have never had an outside dog so I don't know the difference. Thanks.
    Last edited by FAMABRAV; December 16th, 2015 at 07:31 AM.

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  3. #2
    Post-a-holic

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    Keeping your dog inside or outside will not make a difference. My girl is part of the family and will out hunt most other dogs in the field or water.
    Life is to short to hunt with a ugly dog
    LabsRule

  4. #3
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    Keeping the dog inside or outside does not make a difference in their desire to hunt. Personally , I feel an inside dog bonds better with you.

    That said, the better hunting dog is the one you spend time with to develop its hunting desire and traits.

    You will require a location where pup can be left while you are away that will protect him and you from his mischievous deeds. Having him in an outside kennel when you are not home is reasonable. Just make sure that he has accepted the kennel, to keep peace with your neighbor's.

    Not that you will, but shutting them in a kennel until hunting season starts does not make a hunting dog.

    Dick
    "Without Proper Management Wild Life Becomes Your Next Hood Ornament"

  5. #4
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    What makes a working dog is training and discipline; not where its bed is. Think of it this way. Many police K9 handlers bring their partner home, where they have an indoor crate, kennel or room. Such was the case for the OPS and RCMP handlers that I've known.

  6. #5
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    If you intend on having the dog primarily for hunting trials/tests as opposed to a family/hunting dog then you will likely have better results with a kenneled dog. I don't really understand it but from what I have seen, kenneled dogs have a greater desire to please/work.

    Even in the family/hunting dog scenario, caution should be used regarding excessive coddling.

  7. #6
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    Makes no difference. What matters is the quality of your training work and the bond you develop with the dog.

    Fears of coddling the dog are yet another case of projecting human psychology onto dogs.
    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

  8. #7
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    lots of field champions sleep on sofas. I have no desire to have a dog live in a kennel, I like having him at my feet.
    Iím suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  9. #8
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    Great feedback guys, it's nice to hear dog owners and fellow hunters perspective. I was very conflicted on how I was going to pursue this obstacle. Definitely leaning towards keeping him in the house.

  10. #9
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    If you like having him indoors then do it. My buddy has 3 chesapeakes who will break ice and retrieve birds in extreme conditions, they live indoors. I think an outdoor dog likely won't bond with you or the rest of the family as much. If you have kids my guess is your lab will grow to be a companion and body guard to them.
    Last edited by terrym; December 16th, 2015 at 10:04 AM.
    Iím suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  11. #10
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    as others said, it's about the training (incl. exposure, experience, socialization, etc.).
    so if you are able to spend as much time with a kennel dog as you would with your couch potato, then it won't matter.
    most people, just don't want to deal with the dog more than they have to (problem #1) and lock him up outside, where he won't have any interaction with you/the family (problem #2), which brings us to "out of sight out of mind" (problem #3)

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