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Thread: Upland dogs that will also retreive ducks and geese?

  1. #31
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    For hunting purposes it is useful to teach a pointing breed to flush the bird on command ; that way the hunter doesn't have to go into the thick stuff but rather stay in a position for a good shot.
    Last edited by Sharon; January 22nd, 2016 at 08:17 PM.
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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon View Post
    For hunting purposes it is useful to teach a pointing breed to flush the bird on command ; that way the hunter doesn't have to go into the thick stuff but rather stay in a position for a good shot.
    To accomplish what Sharon has suggested you need a very highly trained, obedient dog that is solid on point. This needs a dog that understands the command fetch , allowed to chase and being obedient still to wing , shot and fall. I have only done this with my dogs when they have finished any testing , and or competitions I would chose to enter. Consistent retraining is required, but rewarding when you do have thick cover.


    Dick
    "Without Proper Management Wild Life Becomes Your Next Hood Ornament"

  4. #33
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    Having pointers flush is more common in Europe. A friend of mine has his GSP trained that way. That will be goal for my next dog.
    Iím suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

  5. #34
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    My German Wirehaired Pointer would flush on command . No matter what was required , he would point , flush and retrieve (land and water) on command . --- As far as hunting was concerned , he did just about anything but shoot the game . --- Yeah , I know , I am biased . I loved that dog . --- His only flaw : He was a fighter ! He didn't like other males . If I wouldn't have intervened he would have killed other males (on a few occasions) . He weighed only 80 lbs. but "out-fought" dogs that were 30 lbs. heavier than him .

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon View Post
    For hunting purposes it is useful to teach a pointing breed to flush the bird on command ; that way the hunter doesn't have to go into the thick stuff but rather stay in a position for a good shot.
    If I was ever to have a pointer this would be my goal. In my mind, I got a dog to go into those thick spots so I don't have to.
    "You don't own a cocker, you wear one"

  7. #36
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    [QUOTEa hunting buddy of mine has a german wire haired pointer. he uses it to point grouse and rabbits, and even uses him for late season duck hunting in cold conditions. however he had some trouble retrieving huge local geese in one field hunt we hunted together. but he still chased them down and did his best to bring them to us, but just couldn't pick up some of them for very long. he'd still help you locate a lost big goose though I am sure ..][/QUOTE]

    I am surprised to hear that about your friends German wirehair pointer as my female German shorthair pointer has no issues with retrieving big geese.

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon View Post
    For hunting purposes it is useful to teach a pointing breed to flush the bird on command ; that way the hunter doesn't have to go into the thick stuff but rather stay in a position for a good shot.
    If you have a trained flusher (i.e. a springer), the most basic command is to hup on a whistle. This has to be taught before you try to steady the dog. Use this to hup the dog when he's getting birdy so you can get into a good position. Then give him a go to flush the bird. Done this dozens and dozens of times.

    I'd also hup him when I was pond-jumping ducks, sneak up on the ducks, jump shoot and then call him to retrieve.

  9. #38
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    The biggest challenge in grouse hunting with a flusher, I find, is dealing with wild-flushing birds. If the birds are going up well in front of the dog, and you're behind the dog, you're handicapped from the get-go. Especially if you have all kinds of thick cover in the way.

    Not sure how pointing dogs really compare on that front. If the dog has to go on point 15 yards from the bird the frustrations are probably equal.
    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by welsh View Post
    The biggest challenge in grouse hunting with a flusher, I find, is dealing with wild-flushing birds. If the birds are going up well in front of the dog, and you're behind the dog, you're handicapped from the get-go. Especially if you have all kinds of thick cover in the way.

    Not sure how pointing dogs really compare on that front. If the dog has to go on point 15 yards from the bird the frustrations are probably equal.
    That can be a problem with flushers, pointers or just walking the bush alone. Try to keep the dog in close - within 20 yards.

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by werner.reiche View Post
    That can be a problem with flushers, pointers or just walking the bush alone. Try to keep the dog in close - within 20 yards.
    Hey, I'm busy blaming the dog for my misses. No solutions allowed.
    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

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