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Thread: Hunting Matters: Harvest or Kill?

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting Matters: Harvest or Kill?

    Are you a “killer” or a “harvester?” On this second installment of our Hunting Matter series, we delve into the semantics of hunting lingo. It’s something that I’ve written about in the past, but never quite as thoroughly as Paul McCarney. We’d love to hear what you think after reading his essay. -SR

    For many of us, the months spent in between hunting seasons are filled primarily with two things: preparation for the next season and telling stories about past seasons. Storytelling forges bonds and shares learning, and it’s one of the most important social spaces of creative and intellectual exploration for hunters.

    I imagine that story-telling has always been an inseparable part of hunting. From cave paintings to social media, it’s difficult to overstate the role that story-telling has played in the history of human hunting culture. Hunting is simultaneously solitary and social; philosophical and biological; physical and intellectual, and story-telling plays an important role in shaping and conveying who we are as hunters.

    But what do the words we use to construct our stories reveal about who we are and how we see the world?

    The anthropologist Paul Nadasdy suggests that the language we use to talk about hunting is structured by a system of metaphors and these metaphors give some insight into the way we understand our relationship with wildlife. In particular, Nadasdy refers to a question many of us have discussed: do we harvest or kill wildlife? I’ve encountered many hunters who make it a point to use either the term harvest or kill as well as many others who use them interchangeably, perhaps not giving too much thought about the origins and semantics of the two terms. Some might suggest that it’s pointless to spend time deconstructing words that ultimately refer to the same action; however, both Paul Nadasdy and the writer David Petersen believe that our word choice may actually distinguish us as hunters by expressing certain underlying worldviews concerning wildlife.

    There are compelling arguments to use one term or the other.
    Full story - http://www.themeateater.com/2016/hun...nting-stories/


    I share the same view as the author and many others. I kill. It may sound crude to an outsider, but it's a fact. That's not to say there is no reverence in my doing so. I very much respect the animal and the land it lived on. I demonstrate that respect in the way I use and share the bounty; it feeds me, my family and my friends.

    In conversation, I'll say that I shot a deer or caught a fish. I don't use the word harvest because, because to me that refers to gathering crops. I've never planted deer or fish seeds.

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  3. #2
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    It may sound more butch to say you shot a deer rather than harvested an animal. Thing is unless you shoot the first animal to show up your harvesting a resource. By selecting what and when you take something that's harvesting for me. True actions speak louder than words and how we treat the game and our sport should be how we are judged in reality the world is govern by politically correct speech therefore we must also be sensitive to those that might not be so enlightened.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Well according to the MNRF we harvest....

    https://www.ontario.ca/page/submit-h...arvest-reports

    As was mentioned, a time and place for all words....given your audience and location should determine which words to use.
    Last edited by fratri; March 11th, 2016 at 02:06 PM.
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

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    The person I consider my mentor and for whom I have a tremendous amount of respect for, make no bones about it.

    A number of years ago, with respect to archery he said to me
    " My limit is 30 yards, 40 yards is hoping to kill". I hunt to kill.

    A couple years later while bear hunting together he took a sow. The first shot dropped it flat. When it tried to rise a couple seconds later. The 2nd shot hammered home. It didn't try to get up a 2nd time., nor did we have to track it......

    He hunts to kill and he does it right.

    How someone chooses to interpret that. Well to each their own.

    I to make no bones about it. I hunt to kill.

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    I think you have to kill it to harvest it.....
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
    "Meat is not grown in stores"

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    Well that's true.

    But how we choose to kill.......
    do we stay within our limits, and the limits of our equipment. For my mentor when using a bow, his personal limit is 30yards. He feels at 40+, we start introducing small variables, that "could" lead to missing the vitals. Hence "hoping". Hoping it doesn't jump the string, or a gust of wind pushes it an inch off target, or...etc.

    If you had the chance to put 2nd round into a bear...would you? (No need to answer)

    No matter how we word it, we kill things.
    We owe it to the game to do it as efficiently as possible. When talking to non hunters, I don't pretty it up, or tone it down. I explain I hunt to kill.
    Last edited by JBen; March 11th, 2016 at 02:21 PM.

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    Well the last time we had this discussion it was an 8 pager and 80 posts.....divisive topic.

    http://www.oodmag.com/community/showthread.php?80189-Lets-poke-the-bear

    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBen View Post
    Well that's true.

    But how we choose to kill.......
    do we stay within our limits, and the limits of our equipment. For my mentor when using a bow, his personal limit is 30yards. He feels at 40+, we start introducing small variables, that "could" lead to missing the vitals. Hence "hoping". Hoping it doesn't jump the string, or a gust of wind pushes it an inch off target, or...etc.

    If you had the chance to put 2nd round into a bear...would you? (No need to answer)

    No matter how we word it, we kill things.
    We owe it to the game to do it as efficiently as possible. When talking to non hunters, I don't pretty it up, or tone it down. I explain I hunt to kill.
    Harvest or kill is akin to how do you refer to female coworkers Women or the girls? Why be confrontational to an audience that doesn't share your sediment.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Lol Mike I recall that one. As I said "to each their own"..

    I'm a "meat hunter", in camp "if it's brown it's down". I also "hunt to kill". Some might hear those words and think..Redneck, just another hunter whose itching to kill things. Some might hear those words and think that's not what it means at all.

  11. #10
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    As a hunter in Ontario, we act as agents to the MNR and are provided the privilege to harvest (cull) deer as part of their management plan.

    We are essentially contract killers
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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