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Thread: Wild Leeks are up!!!

  1. #21
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    Fiddle heads are just coming up in Ottawa. Morels are the easiest to start with the distinction between the fable and good is very clear. Also, Morels are the first to come up with Asparagus, fiddle heads, leeks. IF you look at the picture to Ontario edibles it amazing to see what you have always seen in the woods but never knew.

    Youtube has some great links for Ontario mushrooms.
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Nepean, for 2019, Chairman - Ontario Libertarian Party

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  3. #22
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    My first experience with wild leeks was at Camp Meaford.
    As we were patrolling through the area some of the guys were picking them & eating raw.
    The only way you could stand the smell was to join them.




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    Living proof that "beer builds better bellies".

  4. #23
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    I've been picking leeks for a long, long time. I'm lucky, they grow on my property and I have permission up the road where there are tons. I consider them a valuable resource that need to be managed carefully. For that reason I never have or ever will dig up a wild garlic. If I can't properly pick the bulb while leaving the root stock in the ground I don't harvest it. Simple as that. That way the woody stem and associated roots stay in the ground undisturbed and a new bulb will grow from that woody base and root mass.
    I'm not knocking anyone here, specially the OP. It's a good post, I've done the same. This is just to educate.

    Allow me to illustrate.




    See the mass of roots? Those roots are all attached to the up to 3/8" long piece of woody root, not the bulb. The idea is to snap the base of the bulb off of that root. Usually you end up with a few fine roots around the outer part of the base of the bulb.

    These are from last year. As picked. Wiggling the bulb side to side in different directions, going against the grain, specially on slopes, and bend outwards for the ones in dense clumps. Thumb or forefinger dug in deep and pushing sideways helps at times too. The bigger they are the easier to pick.




    Mine aren't that far along yet, but it won't be long before some thin young ones come in for fresh eating. I can't wait.

    For the last five years I've been making a Chefs/ Compound butter with leeks. It's one of my favorite uses for wild garlic now. 4-5 pounds of it a year. I base it on this recipe. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...d-butters.html Highly recommended.

    Cheers
    Smitty

    Straight shooter

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer View Post
    .....just make sure you sleep in the dog house that night....... I swear you can see the stink waves rising off your body......lol.
    My wife was first trimester during leek season last year... she stopped just short of spraying me off with the hose before I was allowed back in the house haha

  6. #25
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    uploadfromtaptalk1461814244303.jpgI'll share one last idea as well. I froze a bunch for the first time last year. Measured out two cups and sealed them in my vacuum sealer. Used them all winter for dips and soups. Yes they were soft when defrosted using this method but was using them for cooking so it didn't matter for my purpose.

    Want to try something tasty? Give this a whirl. I used maple bacon for a little sweetness to it.

    http://www.marthastewart.com/857636/...lized-leek-dip

  7. #26
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    Thanks for the info fellas. Much appreciated!!
    My name is BOWJ..... and I am a waterfowl addict!

  8. #27
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    When do you think they will be ready, I just went and picked some but they were quite small still.

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty55 View Post
    I've been picking leeks for a long, long time. I'm lucky, they grow on my property and I have permission up the road where there are tons. I consider them a valuable resource that need to be managed carefully. For that reason I never have or ever will dig up a wild garlic. If I can't properly pick the bulb while leaving the root stock in the ground I don't harvest it. Simple as that. That way the woody stem and associated roots stay in the ground undisturbed and a new bulb will grow from that woody base and root mass.
    I'm not knocking anyone here, specially the OP. It's a good post, I've done the same. This is just to educate.

    Allow me to illustrate.




    See the mass of roots? Those roots are all attached to the up to 3/8" long piece of woody root, not the bulb. The idea is to snap the base of the bulb off of that root. Usually you end up with a few fine roots around the outer part of the base of the bulb.

    These are from last year. As picked. Wiggling the bulb side to side in different directions, going against the grain, specially on slopes, and bend outwards for the ones in dense clumps. Thumb or forefinger dug in deep and pushing sideways helps at times too. The bigger they are the easier to pick.




    Mine aren't that far along yet, but it won't be long before some thin young ones come in for fresh eating. I can't wait.

    For the last five years I've been making a Chefs/ Compound butter with leeks. It's one of my favorite uses for wild garlic now. 4-5 pounds of it a year. I base it on this recipe. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...d-butters.html Highly recommended.

    Cheers
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    When do you think they will be ready, I just went and picked some but they were quite small still.
    Give it a couple more weeks and they should be good to go! After reading and posting in this thread I had to dig a handful up the other day for a taste........yum!!!! Fried them up with some mushrooms and onions and ate them with some crispy skin mallard breasts and a pint of my bil's lager........I'll be headed to the woods in a couple of weeks for a big batch!!!

    On a side note maybe they don't grow as common in other areas than the ones I hunt, some of my bushes are over run with them.....literally wall to wall leeks along the ridges, would have to pick a couple of dump truck loads to damage the breeding stock.

    Enjoy the good eats guys and gals!!
    I love fishing but REALLY it is just a way to pass time until hunting season!!!!

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer View Post
    Give it a couple more weeks and they should be good to go! After reading and posting in this thread I had to dig a handful up the other day for a taste........yum!!!! Fried them up with some mushrooms and onions and ate them with some crispy skin mallard breasts and a pint of my bil's lager........I'll be headed to the woods in a couple of weeks for a big batch!!!

    On a side note maybe they don't grow as common in other areas than the ones I hunt, some of my bushes are over run with them.....literally wall to wall leeks along the ridges, would have to pick a couple of dump truck loads to damage the breeding stock.

    Enjoy the good eats guys and gals!!
    There were many places on the Quebec side that used to be full of leeks. Then the hordes would show up with shovels and garbage bags and after a few years the crop would be decimated. So now there is no picking allowed at all on NCC property and there is actually a limit of 50 leeks allowed per person now. One farmer out here had guys come all the way from Montreal to pick on his property for a while. Then the shovels showed up as they got lazy and greedy, which ended up costing them their access rights. In May there is a sudden influx of Quebec plates around here. Some have permission but many of them just drive around midweek and midday so they can trespass and steal. Again using shovels so they can sneak in and out fast.

    On the culinary side, I picked a dozen beside the house yesterday. They are mild and sweet, not swollen at all yet. Had them chopped up in a potato salad and some on a bun with grilled sausage. OMG, so damned good. Looks like I'll have to do a lot of daily testing.

    Cheers
    Smitty

    Straight shooter

  11. #30
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    Went to another leek spot today, some bigger ones up now. Looks like I'll still have some time to pick a few more in the next few weeks. Only found one group of fiddleheads, left them alone for now..

    took your guys advice, picked the bigger ones, leaving most of the roots in place, it was actually really easy to pick them and even easier to clean them at home.

    going to add these to my wild turkey soup tonight!!



    Last edited by bowj; May 7th, 2016 at 10:21 AM.
    My name is BOWJ..... and I am a waterfowl addict!

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