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Thread: Switching to bait cast

  1. #11
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    JW78m65.jpg

    Watch for backlash
    Last edited by M_P; June 10th, 2016 at 11:36 AM.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by M_P View Post
    JW78m65.jpg

    Watch for backlash
    Ha ha ha... how the heck did you get a picture of my reel?

  4. #13
    Needs a new keyboard

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    I LOVE COMING HERE. WHAT OTHER GUN/OUTDOOR FORUM CAN YOU BE GUARANTEED GRAMMAR LESSONS ?

  5. #14
    Getting the hang of it

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    my two cents worth
    the best advice advice is go to your local tackle shop and talk to someone who uses the reel type and can give you the best idea based on what type of fishing you are going to do
    but be forwarned baitcasting is a slippery slope
    i stared baitcasting last spring with one reel
    i now have 5 reels and still looking for more lol

  6. #15
    Getting the hang of it

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    Curado I series is a great reel. Only 200 dollars, but not a cheap piece of junk. I would give any of the Curado's a look, they would be a good fit for you.

  7. #16
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    As Monks mentioned there are some questions to be answered. Having said that I use my Shimano Caenan paired with a Abu-Garcia Veritas 6'9" med-heavy rod and 20lb mono for everything from trolling crankbaits to tossing frogs and wacky rigged worms. Mostly for bass and pike but I have caught perch and rock bass with it as well. It's a very good general purpose setup. I also have a more specialised setup for big cats. That one is a Ambassadeur C4 reel on a Browning Six Rivers 8'6" med-heavy rod loaded with 20lb Power-Pro line. It will handle everything from small mudcats to 20lb channel cats. My Shimano setup would be a good one to start with and if you find you like it you can get more specialised gear later.

    The biggest thing is to either carefully read and follow the reel instructions or get someone to show you how to use it. Mine is very easy to set up and adjust to various weights of lures. TC

  8. #17
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    I picked up an Abu-Garcia Ambassadeur several years ago. There was a learning curve to it, sure, but I like it now.

    Something to think about, I am right handed, and my rod stays in my right and I reel with the left on my spinning reel. I saw no reason to change and start switching hands between casting and reeling and blight a left hand model.

    My only real complaint is that the diameter of the crank is smaller than on my spinning reel, so I need to crank faster, or so it seems anyway.

    get yourself a small crochet hook from the craft/hobby store. It will help greatly in untangling the inevitable bird-nests

    i also practiced on my street with a suitable sized sinker to the line. I got several strange looks, but who cares? I used old line until I got the hang of things, then swapped it out for fresh line before hitting the water.

    i bought mine for throwing larger like baits and trolling for other species in shaggy areas or lake trout with dipsey divers, so it is a suitable size for that. If you're throwing bass cranks, a smaller size will probably work better for you.
    Learn all you can about nature. What we don't understand, we fear and what we fear, we destroy.
    Teach a young person to hunt and fish, after all, someone taught you.

  9. #18
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    Well it's been well over a 1000 casts now between my musky with braid and my tatula with mono and I can NOT make a single free loop of line appear even into a 30 klik wind. Must be something I'm missing
    I LOVE COMING HERE. WHAT OTHER GUN/OUTDOOR FORUM CAN YOU BE GUARANTEED GRAMMAR LESSONS ?

  10. #19
    Just starting out

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    Just a few things to consider to increase your chances of success.

    Always get the best tackle you can afford. This need no explanation.

    Balancing the bait casting reel, with a proper rod and terminal gear is paramount to success. You'll never throw a 1/16 jig and grub on a bait casting rod rated for 1-2 oz. If anything, a lot of problems occur because the rod is over powered on the cast , thus a faster start up speed on the reel and then the dreaded backlash if you're not good at thumbing the reel.

    The recommendations above from this forum are all good.

    One piece of advice to help with the backlash problem. Follow the manufacturer's recommended settings of the magnets for the anti-backlash. You're going to have to master the feel of thumbing the spool because conditions (wind, lure weight, fatigue) change and thumbing the spool becomes a "feel" thing. Just like driving a standard shiftier in a car.

    Here is a tip that will eliminate almost all backlashes for a beginner. I used this for both my son and daughter when they were each about 12 years old and they wanted to use a bait caster. After a couple of outings they didn't need this any more. Here is what you do. Go somewhere (back yard, soccer field) and attach a lure (minus the hooks, or tape the hooks to the bait body with electrical tape and then cover all exposed hooks with tape, this is only to set up the reel). Take a few practice casts. Once you got one good distance cast out, pull off 5 or 6 arm lengths of line from the reel. Now take a piece of electrical tape (black) and wrap once around the line on the reel spool, do NOT over lap the tape. This is the maximum distance that you will cast plus about 15 (or so) feet more. Now reel in the line under a little tension. On a worst case scenario, any birds nest will NOT dig into the line below as the tape is protecting it, and all you have is a 5 or six pulls on the line to free and unravel the backlash. If you do get a monster on the line that pulls out line, the tape will fly off because the line under it will lift it off. Take the tape off at the end of the day.

    A couple of sessions with this set up and and you soon get the "feel" of thumbing the spool and the tape trick won't be necessary. I've used this method for a lot of beginners and they all could cast very well, very quickly without the frustration of the constant backlashes, by using the "tape trick".

    Just my 2 cents......muddler

  11. #20
    Just starting out

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    Quote Originally Posted by muddler View Post
    Here is a tip that will eliminate almost all backlashes for a beginner. "tape trick"
    brilliant!!!

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