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Thread: EBR Proposal 012-8104;8105

  1. #1
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    Thumbs down EBR Proposal 012-8104;8105

    WTH is up with this? OMNRF plans to add 39 more townships to the Algonquin Wolf (re-named Easern Wolf) prohibited townships list. Coments are open for 30 days,not that they'll listen to common sense from hunters,in the first place. It looks like the anti-hunting lobbyists have struck again.

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    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

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    Yes,I saw that. The OMNRF is proposing 39 additional townships. Those three areas,Kawartha Highlands,Queen Elizabeth II and Killarney PP only account for a half dozen townships. They don't say where the rest are and 39 townships will encompass a vast area of Southern Ontario which has traditionally been prime Coyote hunting territory. We always knew after the "studies" (Trent U and UofT) researched it to death,that the township restrictions around the Park were completely without merit. So now,instead of eliminating the restrictions,the Ontario government has chosen to do the opposite. It's beyond ridiculous and must be stopped.

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    The wolf tag system was a negotiated compromise only last time. The antis wanted a total ban on harvesting them. Looks like the government is following through on its ideological intent.
    Iím suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog who doesn't like a person.

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    How many here have submitted a comment on this ? I'm still in the process of putting mine down and organizing them , I'd love to see what others are submitting , remember the other side will surly make time to comment and this is far more of a political issue then a science one .
    You got one shot at life where are your sights aimed today ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by trappermatt View Post
    How many here have submitted a comment on this ? I'm still in the process of putting mine down and organizing them , I'd love to see what others are submitting , remember the other side will surly make time to comment and this is far more of a political issue then a science one .
    Political rather than science,it was ever thus. I intend to comment,but,I want more info AND to let my blood pressure go down before I do.

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    According to science released last week. There's only one species of wolf in NA.
    Which would make the "Algonquin" wolf an invasive species.

    odd they get protection when all other invasive/non native aren't.
    ********

    be that as it may, can only imagine the impact on other species.

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/07/28...DC9EEC1C90B201
    Last edited by JBen; August 1st, 2016 at 05:32 AM.

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    Thanks JBen..good link..I like the question :

    Dr. vonHoldt and her colleagues found that the genomes of Eastern wolves that lived in Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario were half gray wolf and half coyote. Red wolves are even more mixed: Their genomes are 75 percent coyote and only 25 percent wolf.

    Some wolf experts were startled by the finding and said it would require further support.
    Linda Y. Rutledge, an expert on Eastern wolves, questioned whether the new study was sufficient to reject them as a separate species. Two Algonquin wolves that were part of the new study, she said, lived during a period when hybridization between coyotes and wolves was unusually common.
    “They’re potentially not representative at all,” she said.
    Playing a bit of the devils advocate; I don't see the issue as a 'us vs them'; sport hunters in essence provide our services to the MNR wildlife management program when they need our services to provide a cull of a native species. In this case they may have ascertained that they need a greater population of large predators in the management area to control other larger species.

    In effect...their desire for larger population of wolves and has nothing to do with specifically denying hunters the opportunity to kill them...but to try and increase the number of Wolves in that area...no hidden agenda.

    I do like the like the question however; why are they protecting, what has been determined to be, an non-native species.
    Last edited by MikePal; August 1st, 2016 at 08:35 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

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    One of the views emerging from recent science (which the paper everyone's citing agrees with) is that the concept of "species" is not particularly useful with canids. The line between species and hybrid is fuzzy.
    "The language of dogs and birds teaches you your own language."
    -- Jim Harrison (1937 - 2016)

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    [COLOR=#333333] In this case they may have ascertained that they need a greater population of large predators in the management area to control other larger species.
    However, many species around APP seem to be in decline. Moose and Deer come to mind right away. The family I hunted 53 with, don't even bother getting their small game anymore. Between the closed season for small game in Central Ontario and very, very few Grouse and Rabbits anymore ( they used to see numerous and get numerous some years ago). They see it (getting small game and wolf/yote tags) as a waste of good $ now. Can say in the years I hunted there we saw a total of
    6 WTs and 1 Grouse over 3 years.

    And from hunting 47 and the Loring yards the past 5 years. I can definitely attest to and increase in dogs and a big drop in WT numbers ( Not saying the increase in dogs, is responsible for the crash in deer) but they are certainly contributing and or not helping.The fact the MNR has gutted tags the past two years, bears all that out...So um...they are so concerned about WT and Moose in the area, but want to protect dogs now? yeah, that makes sense.

    So on the surface theres a lot that doesn't add up. Not the least of which is that provincially and historically non native species aren't looked upon too favourably. Be they Asian carp, be they feral boars or even Pike having been introduced to waters where Musky reside. Why?
    because they (the non natives will breed like rabbits and push out native species) and if Im not mistaken in the case of cross breeders or the potential for cross breeding ( Tiger Musky and/or boars) again. They aren't viewed with much affection

    Would love the hear the MNRs rational behind all the conflicting stances.
    Last edited by JBen; August 1st, 2016 at 05:26 PM.

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