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Thread: 2.5hp gas outboard vs electric trolling

  1. #21
    Getting the hang of it

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    One last thing to check is does the motor have a neutral setting for starting. Everyone on here that has suggested a two stroke never mentioned it. The people that use them want light weight so it gets left out and this can cause some safety issues for some when you start it up (side mounted on a canoe causes it to start moving right away). If you are aware of this and you can get your motor to start at a low rpm you should be okay but I found it to be a pain in the you know where. I have fished in some pretty remote areas and have used a battery for most of them but I seem to enjoy paddling the most as it brings back memories (caught a few trophy specks while paddling). Good luck on which ever you chose as it will bring you many years of enjoyment.

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  3. #22
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    I do believe Honda makes a 2hp with clutch engage to alleviate the instant take off. http://marine.honda.ca/portables/BF2_3

  4. #23
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    I fished with the trolling motor for years... I'd go with the small outboard. Either Honda or Yamaha. (I preferred the Yamaha).

  5. #24
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    I used to wish for neutral while fighting a fish. With my Evinrude I would just point it out to open water and hope....

  6. #25
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    The 2.5hp Yamaha motors have a shift lever with a neutral position. Our camp has one, it's a great little motor.
    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." Ernest Benn

  7. #26
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    I had a Sportspal canoe for more than 25 years and loved it. I always struggled with the same decision and ended up getting no motor at all. Sold the canoe last year and I'm looking for another one now.

    Anyway, one thing to consider is weight distribution.

    I always thought I'd put the battery in FRONT and sit at the back myself with the light electric motor.
    With the gas motor you don't have that option! You sit at the back with the motor and may need to place gear or a rock in front to keep the nose down.
    Every Time You Catch A Fish, It's Guaranteed To Be Wet

  8. #27
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    Not only is all the weight at the back on a gas motor it is also off center on a side mount bracket.




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    Living proof that "beer builds better bellies".

  9. #28
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    One of the advantages of electric that you should consider is a solar panel, my little 40 watt Coleman is all I use for the Truck camper 12V Deep Cycle marine battery. The panel is small enough to transport and strap to cross member on Canoe for charging during the day. In full sun it takes about 2.5 to charge up this battery. I use that battery power at night to run the tv, Boxee Box and charge my phone. It lasts about 6 hours or two movies when duck hunting. On a cloudy day it can up to 6 hrs to charge. SO if going on a solo overnight or a couple day trip it serves a couple of purposes for you. This year I will installing a new 100 watt panel on the roof of Truck camper and upgrading to a true Off Grid battery (210 AMP hours), but will still the 40watt and 12V marine in the camper as a back up.

    Here is a picture of the set up.

    20160916_080739_resized.jpg
    Mark Snow, Libertarian Candidate Nepean, 66 for 2018, Vice Chairman - Ontario Libertarian Party

  10. #29
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    Actually the weight of the gas motor is only a few inches off center on most mounts. I used to carry a five gallon water jug up front. If you almost fill it on site you have 45 lbs of ballast and by leaving it not quite full it will float if you dump the canoe.

  11. #30
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    I ended up scoring a sweet deal on a 2.5hp Suzuki 4 stroke. The internal tank holds 1L of gas, is that enough for a day? The smallest gas cans I see are 4.8L. Is that necessary? I was thinking maybe using those 1L aluminium water bottles to just carry another spare litre in case I run out.
    Last edited by bringit; April 14th, 2017 at 11:40 PM.

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