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Thread: recipes for Cotton tail & hare?

  1. #1
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    Hi guys and gals. Any recipes for cotton tail & hare?

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  3. #2
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    I always boil them first for and hour then cook them cacciatore. Those of you that don't know what that is. First you brown the rabbit them simmer rabbit pieces in tomato sauce . In that tomato sauce you can put green pepper onions and what ever seasoning you like. cook it slow and low. You won't eat hare/rabbit any other way.
    Last edited by tom gobble; October 28th, 2017 at 12:08 PM.
    "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, Teach a man to fish and he eats for the rest of his life"

  4. #3
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    tom gobble suggestion with cacciatore is bang on, done it for years and great results.
    Here's another good one http://www.themeateater.com/2015/chi...rel-or-rabbit/

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    For me like a basic pot roast on a bed of onion, celery, and carrot. Cook till almost falling off the bone. Brown under the broiler for color serve next to polenta.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

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    Do you think that fried rabbit recipe would work with hare
    Quote Originally Posted by fishhawk View Post
    tom gobble suggestion with cacciatore is bang on, done it for years and great results.
    Here's another good one http://www.themeateater.com/2015/chi...rel-or-rabbit/
    "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, Teach a man to fish and he eats for the rest of his life"

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    Tom gobble to be honest I haven't tried it on hare but I don't see why it wouldn't be good.

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    This recipe takes time (a few days) to make but it's the classic hare recipe.
    Jugged Hare
    Ingredients
    1 hare or 3 cottontail rabbits, or 2 domestic rabbits
    Blood from the critters, mixed with a little red wine vinegar (optional)
    2 carrots, grated
    2 celery sticks, minced
    1 large onion, grated
    3 bay leaves
    1 tablespoon dried thyme
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
    1/4 cup brandy
    1 bottle red wine
    flour for dusting
    1/4 pound bacon
    5 tablespoons duck fat or butter
    1/2 ounce dried mushrooms
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 teaspoon quatre epices
    1 pint stock or broth (any kind)
    1/4 pound fresh mushrooms
    1 onion, sliced
    1 tablespoon heavy cream
    1 tablespoons minced parsley
    Salt and black pepper
    Instructions
    MARINATE 1-2 DAYS
    Pour the brandy and the wine into a pot and bring to a boil. Let it boil for a few minutes to burn off most of the alcohol. Turn off the heat.
    Cut the hare into large pieces: back legs, front legs, saddle into several sections — feel between vertebrae for places to chop with a cleaver or heavy knife. Salt it lightly.
    While the wine-brandy mixture is still warm, pour it into a container large enough to hold the hares or rabbits. Add the grated onion, carrot and the minced celery, plus the rosemary, bay leaves and thyme. Mix well.
    When the wine mixture is room temperature, add the hare pieces. Cover and let it marinate in the fridge for a day, or even two.
    MAKE THE STEW
    Take the hare from the marinade and pat it dry.
    Strain the marinade through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl. Set aside the veggies.
    Pour the marinade into a pot and bring to a boil. A raft of scum will form on top. Skim it off carefully. Bring the heat to a simmer, and skim the liquid several times until it is clear, then turn off the heat.
    Heat half the goose fat or lard in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat.
    Dust the pieces of hare in the rye flour — using something other than white flour adds a subtle earthy note to the civet — and brown them in the pot. Take your time with this; you may need to do it in batches. Once the hare is nicely browned, set it aside.
    Meanwhile (you need to multi-task here), heat another tablespoon or two of the goose fat or lard in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When it is good and hot, turn the heat down to medium-low and add the pancetta. If you are using bacon, only use enough goose fat to lubricate the bottom of the pan, as the bacon should be fatty enough.
    Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.
    Slowly cook the pancetta or bacon until crispy. Remove and set aside.
    Add the veggies to the frying pan you cooked the pancetta in, and turn the heat all the way up. It will sputter. Toss and cook the veggies, adding more goose fat or lard as needed. Once they are coated and much of the liquid has steamed off, turn the heat down to medium and cook until they caramelize, about 10-12 minutes. Stir occasionally.
    Return the hare to the Dutch oven and add the pancetta or bacon. Pour over the wine-brandy mixture, then add the veggies. Add the dried chanterelles, the quatre epices and the sugar. Make sure everything is evenly distributed.
    If you think you need more liquid, add the game, veggie or beef stock. Bring this to a simmer and taste for salt — add some if needed.
    Cover and put in the oven and leave it undisturbed for 2 1/2 to 3 hours for a hare, 90 minutes for rabbits.
    MAKING A STEW A CIVET
    Once the hare is tender, almost falling off the bone, carefully remove it from the pot and set aside to cool.
    While the meat is cooling, run everything left in the pot through a food mill with a medium plate. If you don’t have a food mill, run it through a food processor or use an immersion blender. If you are doing this you really should push the blended mix through a sieve or chinois to catch any lumpy bits.
    Clean the Dutch oven, or get another large, lidded pot.
    Pick the meat from the bones of the hare. Try to keep the meat in large pieces and be careful to find any little ribs and such. Discard the bones.
    Return the strained, blended stew to the pot, and add the chile paste, the onion that you have sliced into half-moons as well as the fresh chanterelles. Bring this to a simmer, cover and cook for 20 minutes, or until the onions are nice and soft.
    Return the pieces of hare to the pot and retest for salt. Add generous amounts of freshly ground black pepper.
    Blend the liver, the blood and the heavy cream together in a food processor or blender. Revel in its pink gory glory.
    When the hare is warm again, turn off the heat. Wait until you see no movement of the stew from simmering or boiling, then add a ladleful of the stew to the blood-liver-heavy cream mix. Stir well. Do this again. Now pour the mixture into the stewpot and gently stir it in to combine. Marvel at how well the stew just thickened. DO NOT LET THIS BOIL. Trust me. You can still eat it if it does, but your civet will look nasty and you will be pissed off.
    Serve at once, topped with parsley and accompanied by crusty bread, a green salad, and a really kick- red wine. I’d recommend a Mourvedre.

  9. #8
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    Ok you people ar making me hungry
    Here's something from the old country.Anyone ever been to the island of Capri.There is a restaurant that is world famous for their rabbit, they raise their own.Though they wouldn't share their recipe here is an interesting fact.
    A rabbit or hare here is skinned.There it is "plucked". This keeps the skin intact,allows 2 things.
    One is obvious,it helps the meat retain moisture and flavour from which ever method you use and second a plucked rabbit allows for cuts to be made under the forearms to which they then can be stuffed with Italian breadcrumbs herbs spices etc under the skin all around the body then baked or roasted whole in the oven.
    Try it and imagine yourself on Capri.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by missy83 View Post
    Hi guys and gals. Any recipes for cotton tail & hare?
    For a lot of recipes, just " google " cottontail recipes.

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