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Thread: First rod and reel combo for 5-15lb fish?

  1. #1
    Just starting out

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    Default First rod and reel combo for 5-15lb fish?

    New to fishing and am looking for a decent rod and reel to get me started for salmon, trout, walleye, pike, bass.

    Thinking medium-heavy action rod 7' or more?
    Clueless as to what kind of spinning reel I should get.


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  3. #2
    Has too much time on their hands

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    Boy there are so many choices. Your best bet is to go to a fishing shop and get a feel for several different kinds of rods.yhen set your price range and spend some time playing with the ones that fit your budget.
    Pretty hard to beat the ugly stick for around fishing.
    I prefer longer rods with a fast tip

  4. #3
    Just starting out

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    Quote Originally Posted by dutchhunter View Post
    Boy there are so many choices. Your best bet is to go to a fishing shop and get a feel for several different kinds of rods.yhen set your price range and spend some time playing with the ones that fit your budget.
    Pretty hard to beat the ugly stick for around fishing.
    I prefer longer rods with a fast tip
    Ideally I can find a combo I like but I'm open to buying the rod and reel separately too. I like the shimano convergence rod so far

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  5. #4
    Has all the answers

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    I agree - buy the rod and reel separate. I feel combo deals are created to get rid of a component that is not selling. However normally a good deal.
    You are looking for a setup for salmon, trout, walleye, pike, bass. I don't think you will find a rod/reel combo to cover those fish. Salmon really require a rod size and strength that is overkill on the walleye and bass.
    Most people will have 2 rods - one for walleye, bass, trout and pike etc. And 2nd rod to cover muskie and salmon.
    Two different reels needed also.
    But - if you want one rod/reel combo to handle all fish, I would fish a medium fast tip rod with a 2500 size reel. But too small for a salmon.

  6. #5
    Mod Squad

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    I separate the choice of rod by what fish I'm after. For stuff like lakers, bass and pike most rods will do because they are an attacking type of feeder and tend to set the hook themselves. So most tip actions will work.
    For pickerel however, if you spend a lot of time jigging they just take the bait in their mouths and hold it. You have to set the hook so this means a stiffer action.
    Like the others here, you want to find a reel that fits your hand but is tough enough to take the rigors of trolling.
    One more thing, I'm more comfortable with a 2 piece 6 1/2 ft rod. For me, especially when fishing alone its kinda awkward to get a fish close enough to land with a rod that's out there 7 feet or more.

  7. #6
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    I agree going to be hard to find a rod to do all the fishing you have stated. Personally if I was going to fish all but the salmon and wanted to use 1 rod, I'd go with a 6.5ft 2 piece rod med action, I prefer ugly stick as well with a med size spinning reel, easier to use as a beginner . I'm into fishing so I basically have 3 types of rods and reels, dipsey rods and line counter reels for big water, 5 to 5.5ft med light, with bait casters for vertical jigging, and basically the combo mentioned first for trolling small waters with harnesses and casting.

  8. #7
    Getting the hang of it

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    Medium would be fine I'd think as far as a rod goes. If you're actually looking at getting into THAT many different species, you've got a lot of learning to do. You've also got a lot of terrain to cross and your gear will go through the paces on the river bank. I'd suggest investing far more heavily into a good reel and purchasing cheap rods while you learn. It is also going to depend greatly on HOW you plan on fishing. I apologize for not being able to answer matter-of-fact, however, it's kind of a loaded question. I'd go into a reputable locally owned and operated shop and simply have a talk with them!

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