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Thread: Predation - a symptom of a problem

  1. #1
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    Default Predation - a symptom of a problem

    "Predation is not so much a problem as a symptom of a problem - a habitat problem. When you have good habitat, you can still have good pheasant numbers, even with predators."
    https://pheasantsforever.org/BlogLan...g-Habitat.aspx
    What calm deer hunterís heart has not skipped a beat when the silence of a cold November morning afield is broken by the echoes of hounds tonguing yonder?



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  3. #2
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    One of the problems I have seen locally is the amount of new farms planting ginseng..... There is virtually no place for any critters to hide. It looks barren, no weeds, no tall plants, nothing, it looks like a big dead space.
    I agree, provide the right environment (cover) and all can not only survive but thrive.
    It would be pretty cool if tax credits were given to every farmer who provided cover for animals.... Imagine, for every acre or fence row brush, you get X amount of tax credit....be pretty cool thing to see in action.
    "Everything is easy when you know how"
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    Farmers in my area certainly help feed more turkeys and deer than ever. 200 years ago they did not have no till corn field to graze in the winter or cover crops in the winter or winter wheat. Some of these food sources did not exist 30 years ago.

    If fence rows are to be left then there needs to be an incentive to do so.
    One CO said that there are more deer in our county than when it was all virgin forest because we provide the food


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    With the amount of predators around,I remember reading that in some areas in S Ont their are as many as 21 in a square mile.Thats an old figure,I've seen more than 21 raccoons at a single garbage can.Anyone who has driven around after dark can attest to that.How can a nest survive when it takes a month for the eggs to hatch with all those critters running around every night looking for them.
    We have a habitat issue yes.We can't or refuse to go up against landowners not to destroy what habitat we have left and certainly we can't count on either the MNRF or the OFAH to lobby for it.So what are we left with.Varmint control like they do in Jolly ole England, and the sole reason they have such a high survival rate with released birds and we have such a high mortality rate.
    I don't see the MNRF or the OFAH pushing for that either.
    What's wrong with night hunting for predators? If it's not safe than why is it legal for coon hunters or Natives? In the past few years,and it's only been a relative few that I've noticed an increase in coyote hunting.It's a start but we are still off the mark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ontariofarmer View Post
    Farmers in my area certainly help feed more turkeys and deer than ever. 200 years ago they did not have no till corn field to graze in the winter or cover crops in the winter or winter wheat. Some of these food sources did not exist 30 years ago.

    If fence rows are to be left then there needs to be an incentive to do so.
    One CO said that there are more deer in our county than when it was all virgin forest because we provide the food


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    The deer numbers where very good before European settlers change how the forest were managed. The natives would start fires and burn off the tangled and dead trees/brush. The fires help spread the walnut, acorn, and removed maples and populars. This made fresh grazing and open space for the deer and turkey. Things were not bad till they started trying to prevent all fires. The open spaces filled in and the dead wood and brush builds up till when a fire does go thru it is so hot that nothing survives.
    Sic Gorgia Mus Allos Subjectatos Nunc.

  7. #6
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    Farmers in my area certainly help feed more turkeys and deer than ever. 200 years ago they did not have no till corn field to graze in the winter or cover crops in the winter or winter wheat. Some of these food sources did not exist 30 years ago.

    If fence rows are to be left then there needs to be an incentive to do so.
    One CO said that there are more deer in our county than when it was all virgin forest because we provide the food
    This might be true for deer and turkeys, that can adapt well to woodlots bordered by agricultural fields. But not so much for other game.

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    The biggest predators in southern Ontario is feral cats.

  9. #8
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    We used to hunt a place near Stratford for bunnies. One abandoned homestead had so many feral cats it was unbelievable! We found more than one running around with a dead bunny. Sometimes, those cats would perish from lead poisoning.

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    If it was truly feral cats it would not be such a problem. A winter like this would thin them out considerably and they would become a part of the natural predator prey relationship and balance. What makes cat's so destructive is 90% are really only semi-feral and are getting a helping hand from well meaning but ignorant people. So when hunting is tough and truly wild predators are starving the cat just shows up to a barn or a back door for a free meal which tides him over until he can go back to eating birds and small mammals. The only good function I can see coyotes fulfill in modern southern Ontario is cat control.

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    Quote Originally Posted by singlemalt View Post
    If it was truly feral cats it would not be such a problem. A winter like this would thin them out considerably and they would become a part of the natural predator prey relationship and balance. What makes cat's so destructive is 90% are really only semi-feral and are getting a helping hand from well meaning but ignorant people. So when hunting is tough and truly wild predators are starving the cat just shows up to a barn or a back door for a free meal which tides him over until he can go back to eating birds and small mammals. The only good function I can see coyotes fulfill in modern southern Ontario is cat control.
    Great Horned Owls are also great for keeping feral / semi feral cats under control.

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