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Thread: GMO Corn is actually good for you

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fox View Post
    The deer seem to be doing ok, they are eating tons of the stuff.
    Corn , is not their only food, they are browsers and eat a variety of nutritious foods.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaycee View Post
    Corn , is not their only food, they are browsers and eat a variety of nutritious foods.
    They eat a heck of a lot of corn and soybeans, ask the farmers how much they lose to turkeys and deer.

    Your venison is not organic and non-GMO.

  4. #13
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    Every deer that I ever shot and gutted was packed full of corn in the fall - I always grow a large garden and always make space for corn - some of the corn is really sweet - almost tastes like sugar - man it is good tasting - love going out there every day and picking a couple of ears for dinner in the summer - you can still get old fashioned corn from some seed catalogs - you have to be careful that you plant the same type otherwise the pollination gets screwed up - if you are planting different types you have to keep them separated

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePa View Post
    Every deer that I ever shot and gutted was packed full of corn in the fall - I always grow a large garden and always make space for corn - some of the corn is really sweet - almost tastes like sugar - man it is good tasting - love going out there every day and picking a couple of ears for dinner in the summer - you can still get old fashioned corn from some seed catalogs - you have to be careful that you plant the same type otherwise the pollination gets screwed up - if you are planting different types you have to keep them separated
    The pollination does not do anything to the plant in that year, the weird things happen in the following year. If you have seed that grew really odd corn then it was from the seed that you grew, not from being too close to other corn.

    We always planted yellow beside peaches and cream, never had any yellow only on the peaches and cream and no bi-coloured ones in the yellow only.

    The actual distance you need to keep them apart for seed is a long distance, your garden is probably not big enough to plant 2 types for seed purposes.

  6. #15
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    I am not interested in growing corn for seeds - I grow it to eat - the seed catalogs tell you to keep Sh2, SE/se other types separated by planting at least 10 days apart or 200 ft apart - I have two gardens plots - both are roughly 30 ft by 28 ft - one has a plastic coated metal fence around it - 7 feet high - I have to do that otherwise the animals - especially deer, rabbits, coons and groundhogs would eat everything on me - in the other plot I plant things that the animals don't like to eat - like cucumber, squash and tomatoes - I also have 25 fruit trees that I tend to - pretty much eat off the land in the summer and fall months - I just got my seeds in the mail the other day and will be starting to plant some seeds for seedlings to be planted when the weather warms up - I usually plant peppers around this time of the year because they take a long time to germinate and grow slow - the other thing that I have is 20 blueberry plants - get enough blueberries to last me all year when i freeze them - life is good out here in the country -

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Just plant milk weed. It is what they eat.
    Hi Snowwalker
    I do not say Monarch eat corn-they do eat milkweed.

    But the GMO corn requires different chemicals then the old non GMO corn does for weed control, and that chemical is actually killing the milkweed.So .......
    Also the pollen from GMO corn is deemed toxic to the Monarch Butterflies.

    MANY ARTICLES ON THE NET..........

    If i am to choose,i choose Monarch Butterflies survival, for our kids and grand kids.....alongside the regular corn.
    Last edited by gbk; February 22nd, 2018 at 06:16 PM.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePa View Post
    I am not interested in growing corn for seeds - I grow it to eat - the seed catalogs tell you to keep Sh2, SE/se other types separated by planting at least 10 days apart or 200 ft apart - I have two gardens plots - both are roughly 30 ft by 28 ft - one has a plastic coated metal fence around it - 7 feet high - I have to do that otherwise the animals - especially deer, rabbits, coons and groundhogs would eat everything on me - in the other plot I plant things that the animals don't like to eat - like cucumber, squash and tomatoes - I also have 25 fruit trees that I tend to - pretty much eat off the land in the summer and fall months - I just got my seeds in the mail the other day and will be starting to plant some seeds for seedlings to be planted when the weather warms up - I usually plant peppers around this time of the year because they take a long time to germinate and grow slow - the other thing that I have is 20 blueberry plants - get enough blueberries to last me all year when i freeze them - life is good out here in the country -
    I have something very similar, our house is on an old orchard, we have fence rows covered in blackberries and black raspberries, a 5000sq ft garden and a bunch of different fruit bushes, we can 1000 jars a year or so, some for sale and some for us.

    The cross pollination thing though is not widely known, it is the generation down the road that will be effected, not the one that year, so if you are not keeping seeds then you do not have to worry.

    We keep our own tomato seeds, keep only what produces in our soil, makes for a stronger plant down the road, essentially our own GMO tomatoes and delicious.

  9. #18
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    You have to understand how corn pollinates
    Each strand of silk is one kernel of corn on the cob
    So silk is female tassel is male
    Have two rows of sweet corn side by side each diffferent varieties but have same maturity detassle row A this has to be done before tassel has pollen so while it is still in the whirl
    Row A becomes a female only
    Row B will self pollinate itself plus pollinate row A again if timing is right

    Put a paper bag over a ear of corn before silk appears and you have a blank cob of corn this is why sometimes you have sweet corn with missing kernels the silk was damaged someway by bugs or a bird or weather
    So if you have sweetcorn of one variety that was pollinated by another variety you would be eating traits from both

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by js4fn View Post
    You have to understand how corn pollinates
    Each strand of silk is one kernel of corn on the cob
    So silk is female tassel is male
    Have two rows of sweet corn side by side each diffferent varieties but have same maturity detassle row A this has to be done before tassel has pollen so while it is still in the whirl
    Row A becomes a female only
    Row B will self pollinate itself plus pollinate row A again if timing is right

    Put a paper bag over a ear of corn before silk appears and you have a blank cob of corn this is why sometimes you have sweet corn with missing kernels the silk was damaged someway by bugs or a bird or weather
    So if you have sweetcorn of one variety that was pollinated by another variety you would be eating traits from both
    Yes, but those traits will not actually be seen in the corn until they are planted, the genetics are there but the full change is not.

    The corn pollen can travel on the wind up to a half mile, so if the traits were noticeable in the first year product anyone planting sweet corn within 1/2 mile of cattle corn would have the potential for some pretty brutal sweet corn.

  11. #20
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    Default GMO Corn is actually good for you

    Your missing the timing aspects of pollination (this could be a 48 hour window) why most sweet corn is shorter season than commercial field corn
    I grew commercial production of seedcorn for 25 years worked for a seed company for 20

    Shake your head for a second
    Trait is in that kernel the minute itís formed if itís eaten you ate the traits if itís kept for seed itís carried till next growing cycle where another trait could be introduced
    Last edited by js4fn; February 23rd, 2018 at 10:10 AM.

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