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Thread: Is this the future for hunting?

  1. #11
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    I wonder -- what does it matter to you what an arrangement is between other people?

    I think we all agree that there should be some reciprocity when you're hunting someone else's land. But fewer and fewer people in SW Ontario know how to bale hay, drive a tractor or combine, etc. -- straight cash is definitely less meaningful than some sort of in-kind work, but it is probably way more convenient for both in a lot of circumstances. I would actually love to learn, but I'm sure the folks who let me hunt their property wouldn't want a newbie screwing things up.

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  3. #12
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    I do not see any difference in what he is doing and what others are doing by leasing/paying to hunt ponds on a framers property to hunt ducks or geese, this has been going on for years. In fact my buddy and his son and brother and myself , have done this for a continuous 40 years till the farm was sold a couple of years ago to the conservation authority.
    The farmer that owned the land and ponds, was happy as we controlled it by posting "Posted Ponds " signs around his farm and he did not have to worry about other trespassers, plus the money , bought him tires or such for his farm vehicles every year.

    [COLOR=#000000]" I don't think this guys done his homework or put in the work needed to hunt southern Ont. Looks like a well heeled newbie "
    We weren't well heeled newbies, we just wanted a place to hunt waterfowl and work with my dogs without having to argue with some one else about " oh we were here first and we are hunting these ponds ".
    [COLOR=#000000]
    Last edited by jaycee; March 31st, 2018 at 10:42 AM.

  4. #13
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    Plenty of places to hunt in SW Ontario if you do your homework.
    I rarely ever see another hunter and I hunt mostly Conservation Authority land with permission.

  5. #14
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    Great if you've been able to buy your own land, have family who owns land, or have inherited some land. For those of us who aren't in that situation, sometimes we have to pay to have exclusive access. I hunt public land in my area, but I also pay a landowner for the privilege to access his land. It is the arrangement he prefers, and I am greatful to have a place where I can go hunt and not have to worry about other people. I also offer to help him with stuff around his property.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rf2 View Post
    but I also pay a landowner for the privilege to access his land. It is the arrangement he prefers,
    I'm thinking that paying to lease might be a better scenario than guys who hold 'exclusive access' agreements with farmers on multiple properties and never hunt on them. If they had to pay for the privilege to hold all those parcels, they might not be so greedy and more farms would be available to new hunters.

    Yes lots of 'crown' land available around here...the Limerick forest has only a handful of guys show up on opening weekend....few if any hunt there mid week.
    Last edited by MikePal; April 1st, 2018 at 11:23 AM.
    Arte et marte (By Skill and by Fighting)...The RCEME motto

  7. #16
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    I think it is occurring much more than we collectively think. The farm next to me is leased out during deer season to a group from the montreal area who come over to Ontario every year. I have been offered cash to hunt some of my land on several occasions and sometimes it is tempting because the taxes still have to get paid each year! I think people in the southern part of the province are just looking for quality places to hunt where they don't have to worry about other hunters all the time, i know it was a factor for me when i first bought some land many years ago.
    Rod Embree
    KMG Hunting Safaris

  8. #17
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    Knock on doors and make some friends. My area isn't too bad. All the farmers have my number and know I hunt bear and coyote. Yes, turkey and deer too but they generally will leave the chickens and other domestic animals alone. Ill help them with their chores if they need a hand. Ill share what I get with them. If I get nothing they still get a bottle of their choice or something else they can use just for allowing me to hunt their property. I keep an eye out for them too. If I see something happening that they should know about Ill give them a heads up and help out. Its almost like a barter system. It doesn't hurt that I live in the area and two farmers harvest hay off my land either.
    My point is to be friendly and offer them something in return. It doesn't always have to be money.
    There are three reasons to own a gun. To protect yourself and your family, to hunt dangerous and delicious animals, and to keep the King of England out of your face.
    - Krusty the Clown

  9. #18
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    "Pay to play" is certainly not uncommon in my neck of the woods. I know farmers who lease hunting rights to their properties.

    I'm a farm boy and have access to a ton of land where I grew up, but I don't live there anymore. When I moved away I found it very difficult to get access to private land. I finally got a hunting spot through a friend after a few years of trying. Now I own some land in the country and a few neighbours allow me on their land because they know me, but I've never done well knocking on doors.

    I was out yesterday cleaning fallen trees off a neighbour's field. I also buy him a case of beer at the end of the year, so you might consider me to be paying a hunting lease as well (although a little labour and a case of beer isn't much of a payment!). There are more and more people in Southwestern Ontario every year, but the amount of land stays the same.

  10. #19
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    This has been going on for years, just different form of advertising is all. I was in eastern Ontario on a guide goose hunt few years ago, they had all kinds of land sown up, thousands of acres I believe. I have a couple bush properties that I hunt all private. Sometimes I think it would be cheaper if I was to pay money, instead of spending 6 days cutting wood and giving some deer meat at one place, and fish, baking cookies and pies 4 or 5 times a year at the other, but then again I wouldn't have made great friends with the owners either. Now when I come out to work or baring baked goods, I will get invited in and have a drink or coffee and some good conversation. I guess it is each to their own, but either way it costs you money.

  11. #20
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    Even though we can't drive a tractor for the farmers, when I am scouting or hunting I am always throwing fallen branches or rocks off of their fields. I think they appreciate any effort and if you have a good hunt show the farmers your harvest and offer to share, although they usually are more happy with some no fuss pepperettes and a case of beer. Always a crowd pleaser.

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