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Thread: Water excess Moose hunting tips wanted ....

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfoldivandor View Post
    I was thinking to drive to Hearst then take "some" river ( I picked already ) paddle in canoe 17 ft with my backpack set up a camp and hunt from there on foot in the bush .
    ( I can flip back canoe in the water ( the empty one )and climb back in... )
    "Can you read and runs/current?" No I newer down that with canoe ..
    One time went rafting on Ottawa river ...
    I can walk 20-30 km with backpack I down some solo successful bear hunt ,
    with my ""motorhome"" (Pontiac Grand AM...)

    I am familiar with the map site you give me , I am using it , and find where i am thinking to go ...
    Thanks for reply and advise . I appreciate.
    Any rivers close to Hearst will have hunting groups already establish. Not to say that if you travel a bit you can find a nice quiet spots. It doesn't have to be a huge river, smaller creeks hold Moose also. Hunting from a boat or canoe in the fall can be very cold. Dress appropriately and have at all times a dry bag with all that is needed if you get wet or spend the night in the bush. Hunting from a canoe can be very rewarding. Good Luck
    "When you piss in the wind, you will get your feet wet."
    Deer Hunter

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  3. #12
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    If you stops at last Tim Horton and have a laptop and open on multiple window ( Sat image ) the area you want to hunt
    later in the bush with no internet connection will be able to move around on satellite image..
    try it at home by do this and then disconnect the internet , you will see what I am talking about ...

    I do this in the middle of the bush .....







    Quote Originally Posted by SK33T3R View Post
    OK smarty pants! good site for sure.

    do you know how to capture satellite imagery to upload into my garmin Oregon 600 ???... so I don't have to buy another 1 yr subscription of birdseye.

    last subscription I got all my moose spots and bear spots and fishing spots were all done in winter conditions with snow covering everything. almost useless.

    called and complained to garmin but they said it was out of their hands. BUT they did extend their hands when they took my money!

    Appears as though they use google earth as their provider.

    Nothing I can do until the satellite decides to take more pics on another flyover. which Garmin has no idea when it will be!
    Last edited by alfoldivandor; May 18th, 2018 at 05:29 AM.

  4. #13
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    Thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Species8472 View Post
    A whole bunch of info to cover so bear with the length of my post.

    Topographic maps are great but the most important thing to remember when using them is that they are the cartographer's interpretation of the underlying stereoscopic image pairs and reflect objectives that are different than yours. Stereo image pairs are always a better tool if you have a trained eye. They can be used to generate your own 3D representations using stereo glasses (like the ones at 3D movies). From the 3D image you can identify vegetation type, the height of trees in the area, your own contour interval, potential campsites and the list goes on.

    Once your route is planned than you need to select a canoe (might be irrelevant if you already own one but still useful info for understanding your canoe). Canoes have two types of stability - initial and secondary. Initial stability is associated with wide flat bottoms and at rest, at slow speed and in calm conditions the canoe is very stable. They are hard to tip at rest but when they do tip they often do so with very little warning. Canoes with a high initial stability sacrifice speed and handling capabilities. Most cottage, camp and recreational type canoes are in this category. Canoes with high secondary stability feel tippy when you get in but at speed, in the wind, in rough conditions/whitewater they are more stable than their flat bottom cousins. They are also faster and have better responsiveness and handling and if they are going to tip you can feel it coming. I prefer a canoe with high secondary stability and both of the canoes I own reflect this.

    After the question of stability comes whether to have a keel (and how big a keel) or not. A keel reduces the tendency of the canoe to turn (either from the wind or your stroke). If you are doing primarily river travel you want minimal or no keel. Lake travel and you want more keel. One of my canoes has a keel and the other doesn't.

    Then comes the question of symmetrical or asymmetrical hull. A symmetrical hull means if you cut the canoe in half at the mid point the 2 resulting hull pieces would be identical in shape. Asymmetrical hulls have their widest point further back than the middle. A symmetrical hull is better for soloing as typically one paddles the canoe backwards. Asymmetrical hulls are better for tandem paddling and are faster as the hull profile has less drag. My 17 foot is symmetrical and my 18 foot is asymmetrical.

    Next up comes material of construction. Basic categories are aluminum, plastic, fiberglass, kevlar, and carbon. Aluminum is slow and heavy unless it is thin gauge like the Sportspals but in that case the thin gauge makes them fragile. Plastic is faster and virtually indestructible but is heavy. Fiberglass is similar in weight to plastic and fast as well. Fiberglass is not as tough as plastic but is super easy to repair in the field. Kevlar and carbon are light, fast, expensive and harder to repair in the field. Whatever you end up with make sure you have some reliable way to carry out emergency repairs. Size wise 17 feet is probably the minimum I would go with. My two canoes are 17 and 18 and both kevlar. The 17 has an 800+ lb payload and the 18 is 900+ lb.

    Next up is paddles. This is largely personal but design, fit and weight is important. I prefer a shaft with a 13 degree bend and a Sugar Island style blade. The bent shaft makes them up to 40% more efficient. Also remember to bring at least one spare per canoe.

    You indicated hunting on foot from a base camp. Don't discount the idea of floating the river and hunting from the canoe. Shooting from a canoe is different so i suggest getting some practice in. Also make sure your self rescue skills are good - practice a bunch. Also get some dry bags, wet clothes and wet sleeping bags suck. If more than one canoe is going practice canoe over canoe rescue a bunch. Also if there are rapids that cannot be safely run make sure you have gear to cut/clear a portage. Pre-existing portage trails may not exist or could be blocked by windfall so I bring a light Stihl chainsaw, a 5 litre mix can of fuel, machete and small axe. Gear wise take the minimum and make it as light as possible without sacrificing performance.

    Also last but not least make sure you can do at least these 6 strokes in your sleep:

    - Forward
    - Back
    - Draw
    - Cross Draw
    - Pry
    - J

    Once you have those down solid than it wouldn't hurt to learn some of the more advanced strokes. Lots of youtube videos for that.

    Edit:

    Forgot cedar/canvas layup in my materials of construction. Cedar canoes are the most classy and are also relatively expensive. Depending on the build they can be strong, light and fast but can also be heavy and slow.

  5. #14
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    Now it may sound strange and like too much work, but use the Canoe as a cargo barge and tow it with a quality( I said QUALITY) Kayak. A 12 to 14 foot sit on kayak towing a 17 or 18 foot canoe will let you get way up river and setup camp. The thing you need to remember is that your canoe may have 800 to 900 pound capacity, when you start adding gear, food, yourself there is not a lot of capacity left. Gear 120lbs, food 60 to 70 pounds, some clothes 30 pounds, plus in my case 240 pounds. That adds up to 450 to 460 pounds you can not carry. My kayak can carry 350 pounds, which may not seem like a lot but that is me, dry bags with overnight/survival gear, guns, and ammo. I am just heading for a camp site, beach canoe and make camp. Use the kayak for your hunting, fishing( there are fish that have never seen a jig in those water). If something happens to the canoe or kayak you still have something to get out with.

    Personally if I am solo I like to go up stream. Even on a small creek being up stream means if I am injured, I can drift out of the woods. You will not be paddling far with something like a broken arm or injured hand.

    Just my two cents...not even a nickle's worth I guess.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  6. #15
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    Snowwalker,
    Your reasoning for heading upstream makes sense for a bunch of reasons. Floating out a 1000 lb + moose with the current as your friend is another really good reason to hunt upstream of your drop area.
    Guns have two enemies................rust and government

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    Now it may sound strange and like too much work, but use the Canoe as a cargo barge and tow it with a quality( I said QUALITY) Kayak. A 12 to 14 foot sit on kayak towing a 17 or 18 foot canoe will let you get way up river and setup camp. The thing you need to remember is that your canoe may have 800 to 900 pound capacity, when you start adding gear, food, yourself there is not a lot of capacity left. Gear 120lbs, food 60 to 70 pounds, some clothes 30 pounds, plus in my case 240 pounds. That adds up to 450 to 460 pounds you can not carry. My kayak can carry 350 pounds, which may not seem like a lot but that is me, dry bags with overnight/survival gear, guns, and ammo. I am just heading for a camp site, beach canoe and make camp. Use the kayak for your hunting, fishing( there are fish that have never seen a jig in those water). If something happens to the canoe or kayak you still have something to get out with.

    Personally if I am solo I like to go up stream. Even on a small creek being up stream means if I am injured, I can drift out of the woods. You will not be paddling far with something like a broken arm or injured hand.

    Just my two cents...not even a nickle's worth I guess.
    Sounds like he knows what he's talking about....I would take note!! Good Advice
    "No one's interested in something you didn't do"

  8. #17
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    There are lakes you can see from major highways and roads that people drive by everyday, that no one has ever hunted on or fished because they are surrounded by Bogs and thick brush. Only way in and out is by a little creek.

    I drive Hwy 11, and 17 for example and there are creeks that go under the road all over the place. When you look on a topo or google earth for example, you see that just a couple twists and turns of the creek would put you on a good sized lake. There are no quad trails in the area and when you look at the area in person all you see is bog, grass and thick willows and pine trees. How many years have the fish lived in that lake and have never seen a lure? How many moose, bear, and deer are hiding along the shore line in the bush?

    I can remember growing up and there being a rat boat ( 6 foot long canoe), or peiroe out beside just about every house or down by the shore.
    Then everyone started buying bass boats and moved out on the big lakes. The little lakes never got fished or hunted.

    I think we need to recommisson the bog navy..just a sturdy kayak/canoe, some jigs and tackle.
    Who's with me?
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

  9. #18
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    I will go bear hunting Wmu 25-26-27 living on 28 for two weeks , driving by
    i will check it out the area you recommend ,
    do you have a lot of free time for outdoor ..?



    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwalker View Post
    There are lakes you can see from major highways and roads that people drive by everyday, that no one has ever hunted on or fished because they are surrounded by Bogs and thick brush. Only way in and out is by a little creek.

    I drive Hwy 11, and 17 for example and there are creeks that go under the road all over the place. When you look on a topo or google earth for example, you see that just a couple twists and turns of the creek would put you on a good sized lake. There are no quad trails in the area and when you look at the area in person all you see is bog, grass and thick willows and pine trees. How many years have the fish lived in that lake and have never seen a lure? How many moose, bear, and deer are hiding along the shore line in the bush?

    I can remember growing up and there being a rat boat ( 6 foot long canoe), or peiroe out beside just about every house or down by the shore.
    Then everyone started buying bass boats and moved out on the big lakes. The little lakes never got fished or hunted.

    I think we need to recommisson the bog navy..just a sturdy kayak/canoe, some jigs and tackle.
    Who's with me?

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfoldivandor View Post
    I will go bear hunting Wmu 25-26-27 living on 28 for two weeks , driving by
    i will check it out the area you recommend ,
    do you have a lot of free time for outdoor ..?
    Not the last few years. But now I should have most if not every weekend off. I may take to carrying the kayak and gear to work with me. Take a couple weekends and just head up north. No too hard, just put in at the south end of Simone and fish for example. Vacation this year will be a run down to NS for Xmas. Next year is three weeks of roaming/overlanding through Northrn Ontario.
    Got Two 4X4's and so far only 4 people. Figure 6 would be better eight maximum No set in stone plans, Mom wants some fish, Karen wants to fish and shoot chickens, I just want to not break anything on the trucks.

    by the way I am now using a 48" monitor. Yes I said FORTY EIGHT inch monitor. Sure makes reading Sat and 3D Images easier.
    Last edited by Snowwalker; May 20th, 2018 at 12:51 PM.
    Take the warning labels off. Darwin will solve the problem.

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