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Thread: Water excess Moose hunting tips wanted ....

  1. #1
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    Default Water excess Moose hunting tips wanted ....

    Water excess Moose - Bear hunting tips wanted ....

    I am thinking to get away from the crowd for moose - Bear hunt ,

    to canue in on some river , way back where is no people ,

    no logging road just a wilderness ....

    I don't want to fly in , I like to find my hunting ground ,

    for me and for my hunting group,

    So we can be successful year after year ....

    Any comment help for planing that kind of hunt would be appreciated

    Thanks in advance

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  3. #2
    Borderline Spammer

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    I would guess if folks know of such a spot they would keep it to themselves............good luck in your quest though
    Guns have two enemies................rust and government

  4. #3
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Canoe in for bear is easier than moose (at least in my experience). Do you want to drive somewhere, set up camp and than use that as a base for day-tripping via canoe (relatively easy) or do you want to put in and than move camp every day and hunt along the way (harder)? How proficient are you in a canoe? Can you solo an 18 footer with 800 or 900 lbs loaded in the wind/waves/current? Ever moved 800 or 900 lbs and a canoe over a 1/2 mile portage? Can you read and run rapids?

    Give me some feedback and I can try to give you some pointers. As far as scouting a place goes I have found most of my canoe in places by using Ontario Make a topo map. Zoom in on the area you are interested in and than turn off the topographic information layer. This will reveal the most recent satellite images (typically more detailed and more recent than google earth) for the area you are interested in. The images will reveal many logging roads and ATV trails not shown on the topo layer. It will also allow you to see rapids in more detail.

    Link for mapping/images:

    http://www.gisapplication.lrc.gov.on...M&locale=en-US
    Last edited by Species8472; May 17th, 2018 at 07:35 PM.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

  5. #4
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    I was thinking to drive to Hearst then take "some" river ( I picked already ) paddle in canoe 17 ft with my backpack set up a camp and hunt from there on foot in the bush .
    ( I can flip back canoe in the water ( the empty one )and climb back in... )
    "Can you read and runs/current?" No I newer down that with canoe ..
    One time went rafting on Ottawa river ...
    I can walk 20-30 km with backpack I down some solo successful bear hunt ,
    with my ""motorhome"" (Pontiac Grand AM...)

    I am familiar with the map site you give me , I am using it , and find where i am thinking to go ...
    Thanks for reply and advise . I appreciate.



    Quote Originally Posted by Species8472 View Post
    Canoe in for bear is easier than moose (at least in my experience). Do you want to drive somewhere, set up camp and than use that as a base for day-tripping via canoe (relatively easy) or do you want to put in and than move camp every day and hunt along the way (harder)? How proficient are you in a canoe? Can you solo an 18 footer with 800 or 900 lbs loaded in the wind/waves/current? Ever moved 800 or 900 lbs and a canoe over a 1/2 mile portage? Can you read and run rapids?

    Give me some feedback and I can try to give you some pointers. As far as scouting a place goes I have found most of my canoe in places by using Ontario Make a topo map. Zoom in on the area you are interested in and than turn off the topographic information layer. This will reveal the most recent satellite images (typically more detailed and more recent than google earth) for the area you are interested in. The images will reveal many logging roads and ATV trails not shown on the topo layer. It will also allow you to see rapids in more detail.

    Link for mapping/images:

    http://www.gisapplication.lrc.gov.on...M&locale=en-US
    Last edited by alfoldivandor; May 17th, 2018 at 09:10 PM.

  6. #5
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    I did not asked for spot .

    Just for advise how to do it ...


    Quote Originally Posted by huntnmachine View Post
    I would guess if folks know of such a spot they would keep it to themselves............good luck in your quest though

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfoldivandor View Post
    I did not asked for spot .

    Just for advise how to do it ...
    Is this your first solo trip or will someone be with you?
    Socialism has an entrance and an exit. Vote your way in and shoot your way out.

  8. #7
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    Yes it will be , I am just planing for the future ,
    This year will be camping on crown land , with my hunting group .

    I am just planing for next season .
    May be solo , or with hunting friends ,
    if the will willing to come with me ...

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Species8472 View Post
    Canoe in for bear is easier than moose (at least in my experience). Do you want to drive somewhere, set up camp and than use that as a base for day-tripping via canoe (relatively easy) or do you want to put in and than move camp every day and hunt along the way (harder)? How proficient are you in a canoe? Can you solo an 18 footer with 800 or 900 lbs loaded in the wind/waves/current? Ever moved 800 or 900 lbs and a canoe over a 1/2 mile portage? Can you read and run rapids?

    Give me some feedback and I can try to give you some pointers. As far as scouting a place goes I have found most of my canoe in places by using Ontario Make a topo map. Zoom in on the area you are interested in and than turn off the topographic information layer. This will reveal the most recent satellite images (typically more detailed and more recent than google earth) for the area you are interested in. The images will reveal many logging roads and ATV trails not shown on the topo layer. It will also allow you to see rapids in more detail.

    Link for mapping/images:

    http://www.gisapplication.lrc.gov.on...M&locale=en-US
    OK smarty pants! good site for sure.

    do you know how to capture satellite imagery to upload into my garmin Oregon 600 ???... so I don't have to buy another 1 yr subscription of birdseye.

    last subscription I got all my moose spots and bear spots and fishing spots were all done in winter conditions with snow covering everything. almost useless.

    called and complained to garmin but they said it was out of their hands. BUT they did extend their hands when they took my money!

    Appears as though they use google earth as their provider.

    Nothing I can do until the satellite decides to take more pics on another flyover. which Garmin has no idea when it will be!
    Last edited by SK33T3R; May 17th, 2018 at 11:18 PM.
    If you keep doing what you've always done. You'll keep getting what you've always got!
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  10. #9
    Needs a new keyboard

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    A whole bunch of info to cover so bear with the length of my post.

    Topographic maps are great but the most important thing to remember when using them is that they are the cartographer's interpretation of the underlying stereoscopic image pairs and reflect objectives that are different than yours. Stereo image pairs are always a better tool if you have a trained eye. They can be used to generate your own 3D representations using stereo glasses (like the ones at 3D movies). From the 3D image you can identify vegetation type, the height of trees in the area, your own contour interval, potential campsites and the list goes on.

    Once your route is planned than you need to select a canoe (might be irrelevant if you already own one but still useful info for understanding your canoe). Canoes have two types of stability - initial and secondary. Initial stability is associated with wide flat bottoms and at rest, at slow speed and in calm conditions the canoe is very stable. They are hard to tip at rest but when they do tip they often do so with very little warning. Canoes with a high initial stability sacrifice speed and handling capabilities. Most cottage, camp and recreational type canoes are in this category. Canoes with high secondary stability feel tippy when you get in but at speed, in the wind, in rough conditions/whitewater they are more stable than their flat bottom cousins. They are also faster and have better responsiveness and handling and if they are going to tip you can feel it coming. I prefer a canoe with high secondary stability and both of the canoes I own reflect this.

    After the question of stability comes whether to have a keel (and how big a keel) or not. A keel reduces the tendency of the canoe to turn (either from the wind or your stroke). If you are doing primarily river travel you want minimal or no keel. Lake travel and you want more keel. One of my canoes has a keel and the other doesn't.

    Then comes the question of symmetrical or asymmetrical hull. A symmetrical hull means if you cut the canoe in half at the mid point the 2 resulting hull pieces would be identical in shape. Asymmetrical hulls have their widest point further back than the middle. A symmetrical hull is better for soloing as typically one paddles the canoe backwards. Asymmetrical hulls are better for tandem paddling and are faster as the hull profile has less drag. My 17 foot is symmetrical and my 18 foot is asymmetrical.

    Next up comes material of construction. Basic categories are aluminum, plastic, fiberglass, kevlar, and carbon. Aluminum is slow and heavy unless it is thin gauge like the Sportspals but in that case the thin gauge makes them fragile. Plastic is faster and virtually indestructible but is heavy. Fiberglass is similar in weight to plastic and fast as well. Fiberglass is not as tough as plastic but is super easy to repair in the field. Kevlar and carbon are light, fast, expensive and harder to repair in the field. Whatever you end up with make sure you have some reliable way to carry out emergency repairs. Size wise 17 feet is probably the minimum I would go with. My two canoes are 17 and 18 and both kevlar. The 17 has an 800+ lb payload and the 18 is 900+ lb.

    Next up is paddles. This is largely personal but design, fit and weight is important. I prefer a shaft with a 13 degree bend and a Sugar Island style blade. The bent shaft makes them up to 40% more efficient. Also remember to bring at least one spare per canoe.

    You indicated hunting on foot from a base camp. Don't discount the idea of floating the river and hunting from the canoe. Shooting from a canoe is different so i suggest getting some practice in. Also make sure your self rescue skills are good - practice a bunch. Also get some dry bags, wet clothes and wet sleeping bags suck. If more than one canoe is going practice canoe over canoe rescue a bunch. Also if there are rapids that cannot be safely run make sure you have gear to cut/clear a portage. Pre-existing portage trails may not exist or could be blocked by windfall so I bring a light Stihl chainsaw, a 5 litre mix can of fuel, machete and small axe. Gear wise take the minimum and make it as light as possible without sacrificing performance.

    Also last but not least make sure you can do at least these 6 strokes in your sleep:

    - Forward
    - Back
    - Draw
    - Cross Draw
    - Pry
    - J

    Once you have those down solid than it wouldn't hurt to learn some of the more advanced strokes. Lots of youtube videos for that.

    Edit:

    Forgot cedar/canvas layup in my materials of construction. Cedar canoes are the most classy and are also relatively expensive. Depending on the build they can be strong, light and fast but can also be heavy and slow.
    Last edited by Species8472; May 18th, 2018 at 12:05 AM.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

  11. #10
    Needs a new keyboard

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    Quote Originally Posted by SK33T3R View Post

    do you know how to capture satellite imagery to upload into my garmin Oregon 600 ???... !
    Sorry man. My skills are limited to screenshots converted to jpegs or pdfs. You be SOL.
    They say a man turns old when sorrow and regret take the place of hope and dreams

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