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Thread: Roughed Grouse in Decline!

  1. #11
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    It can be very frustrating-I have a 150 acre woodlot in Bruce county--many mature trees- would love to open up some large areas for new regrowth--contacted the MNR- zero help- nothing more than something about clear cutting being illegal--I explained that my goal would be 5 or 6 sections maybe an acre or two square to promote new growth which is so important for grouse. That went over like a T-bone steak at a vegan brunch. I have planted numerous berry plants -and fertilized numerous apple trees but it can be a real challenge.
    Last edited by stilchen67; May 21st, 2018 at 12:09 AM.

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  3. #12
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    I think because of so many fisher, owls, skunks and coons that the grouse have a problem protecting their nests many eggs are lost before hatching.

  4. #13
    Getting the hang of it

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    They seem to be doing good in northern Ontario. I was happy to see quite a few at my camp this weekend.
    "When you piss in the wind, you will get your feet wet."
    Deer Hunter

  5. #14
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    Although I haven't seen your wood lot, you would probably better off doing a remnant removal removing dead / dying tree's and imperfect ones and doing a thinning.
    "This is about unenforceable registration of weapons that violates the rights of people to own firearms."—Premier Ralph Klein (Alberta)Calgary Herald, 1998 October 9 (November 1, 1942 – March 29, 2013)

  6. #15
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    Their is not one piece of legislation protecting wildlife on private property in S Ont
    That is odd because the MNR in its 50 or so year history as a legislative body has never enacted any.
    Other ministries ie MNDM ,MTO etc have enacted 100's if not thousands. To keep up with the times.
    I was discussing this with the OFAH recently.As a voice , they don't seem concerned.
    Grouse is the top upland game we have. As others have said,it's not a turkey or a deer so no one cares.
    DNR Michigan,Pennsylvania,Kentucky,etc they seem to care.They are spending $$$ on studies.
    OFAH spend 4.4 mill (this number came from them) on trying to reinstate the spring bear hunt to no avail,it was reinstated years later due mostly to the numerous Bear complaints the mnr didn't have the resources to deal with, and the the local police forces were not trained to handle.
    Is the OFAH concerned about grouse and west Nile? Check their website?

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom gobble View Post
    I asked if it was possible to form a small group to get together and try to help restore areas of the forest for small game. We were not asking for anything just an ok to volunteer our time.
    Your local CA doesn't want volunteers doing habitat work for a host of reasons,, not least of which is liability. What they need is money raised to pay for the management plans and the work crews.

    Quote Originally Posted by finsfurfeathers View Post
    Can't be a money thing as no real investment is needed.
    It absolutely is a money thing. Nothing is free, and even if the lumber you cut has value, you still have to pay for the planning not to mention the planting. There's a reason groups like RGS are all about fundraising.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaycee View Post
    One thing they can do is educate farmers /landowners about their bush lots/forests.
    Yes, they can ... but municipal forestry bylaws in southern Ont. prohibit the cutting you need to do to restore grouse habitat. Mature forest needs to be cleared out on a rotating cycle but clearcutting is not allowed.

    As for woodcock, the limiting factor in many areas is not young forests but singing fields.

    Quote Originally Posted by Couliewalker View Post
    Their is not one piece of legislation protecting wildlife on private property in S Ont
    That is odd because the MNR in its 50 or so year history as a legislative body has never enacted any.
    MNR doesn't make laws or regulations. That's what Queens Park is for.

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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by stilchen67 View Post
    It can be very frustrating-I have a 150 acre woodlot in Bruce county--many mature trees- would love to open up some large areas for new regrowth--contacted the MNR- zero help- nothing more than something about clear cutting being illegal--I explained that my goal would be 5 or 6 sections maybe an acre or two square to promote new growth which is so important for grouse. That went over like a T-bone steak at a vegan brunch. I have planted numerous berry plants -and fertilized numerous apple trees but it can be a real challenge.
    Sounds like what you need is some guys with a chainsaw and a good back to open up that bush lot. Ever thought of organizing a bush day? Sure there would be those here willing to offer assistance for a chance to run their dogs or all the firewood they can carry.
    Time in the outdoors is never wasted

  9. #18
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    I’ve been asked by another forum member to share some of the things I have done to enhance my property to maintain great habitat not only for Grouse but many other types of birds and mammals. I’ll start by giving a little background regarding the property that I have owned for 30 years and where My wife and I have retired.
    Our property consists of 102 acres with 70 acres hardwood mixed forest that had aspen growing along the edges. The only conifers were hemlock and a few pines that had been planted by the previous owner about 15 years before we bought it. There were 12 acres of hayfield with the remaining 20 acres being meadows with wild apple, Hawthorne, ninebark and various native shrubs like service berry.
    About 28 years ago we started to plant trees and we did so for the next 19 years, planting approximately 5,000 seedlings. Types of trees planted:
    Red cedar, spruces, red pine, red oak, black locust, butternut, scotch pine(very few) .
    The last 5 years since retiring to this property, we planted an additional 4,000 trees, mainly white pine, spruces, cedar and a few sumac, Nannyberry, white birch, cedar and more oaks.
    With the exception of the last 4,000 trees, We planted our trees along the edges of meadows and in the middle of small clearings. These are not plantation type planting’s as many of the trees were planted in clumps.
    Over the years we have developed a series of paths running through the meadows and the forest. These paths are regularly mowed and are from 3 to 6 feet wide. Now that the trees we have planted are from 12 to 20 feet high, they provide cover and food for the various animals and birds living on our property. While we do trim the Hawthorne,etc along the paths, most of it is allowed to grow wild. Our property also has a number of spring ponds, a shallow pond for wildlife, a creek that runs through one corner and most recently a deep spring fed pond near our house.
    There are also numerous fruits growing on the property including raspberry, blackberry, wild strawberry, many varieties of wild apple, pears, Hawthorne’s, wild grape, Nannyberry, several types of cherry and service berry.
    The difference in elevation is about 80 feet from the forest to the creek. Now that many of the trees we have planted are more mature, we have a varied series of habitats throughout the property. There are also many different levels of vegetation growing and all of this contributes to a very diverse environment. I have also maintained a couple of mineral sites for about 25 years. For years I have also maintained Wood Duck nesting boxes and Blue Bird nesting boxes.
    We have seen a big improvement in the number of birds and animals living on our property over the years. The number of game animals that have increased includes Ruffed Grouse, Wild Turkey, Woodcock, Wood Ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Canada Geese, White Tailed Deer and many different types of rabbits and squirrels. There are over 80 species of birds that use our property to nest and another 40 or so that have been seen on or over our place.
    Our approach has been to develop a number of habitats throughout our property and to leave much of the property to “run wild”. We monitor the wildlife through observations in person and through the use of trail cameras.
    My wife and I were very fortunate to be able to retire early so that we can enjoy all of the wildlife on our property. I guess the only other thing that I have to attract wildlife is a large number of bird feeders and planting a small food plot.
    The changes we have made over the years have enhanced our property for wildlife, including Ruffed Grouse. The fact that the Grouse are very wary and that I can’t seem to shoot many of them, also contribute to their success.
    A number of forum members have been up to our place over the years and have seen first hand the changes we have made. I’m looking forward to many more years of hunting,fishing, maintainance of the property and observations .
    Last edited by JMatthews; May 22nd, 2018 at 12:50 PM.

  10. #19
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    Excellent work JMatthews ! You and your wife should be very proud of yourselves on such a commitment. My father in-law did something very similar about 25 years on a very large piece of property he owned. I just recently purchased a small farm and hope to purchase additional adjacent land with a similar plan for my children and grand children to enjoy when I am long gone.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellow dog View Post
    Excellent work JMatthews ! You and your wife should be very proud of yourselves on such a commitment. My father in-law did something very similar about 25 years on a very large piece of property he owned. I just recently purchased a small farm and hope to purchase additional adjacent land with a similar plan for my children and grand children to enjoy when I am long gone.
    I have kept a journal to keep track of weather, wildlife, family stuff, etc and I also keep track of trees planted and other changes to the property. It’s nice to look back at past journals to see the history of our property.

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