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Thread: Questions about Long Point

  1. #1
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    Default Questions about Long Point

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    I'm looking at potentially participating in the lottery at Long Point, but it looks like a very complicated system -- even after reading the Information Package put out by the LP Waterfowlers Association. Does anyone here know how it works?

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  3. #2
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    Are you talking about the reservation system?
    "I may not have gone where I was supposed to go, but I ended up where I was supposed to be"

  4. #3
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    The blinds are assigned on the morning of the hunt. There is a line-up of cars and a reservation system that are used to determine the sequence of who gets to pick their blind first.

    I can't remember exactly how the order goes... but I thought it was
    1st pick = Lineup car #1
    2nd pick = Reservation #1
    3rd pick = Lineup car #2
    4th pick = Reservation #2

    etc. Someone correct me here if I'm wrong.

    I could be wrong on the order but it goes something like that. The "lottery" part is where you enter the draw for a reservation for a given date. The lineup is first come, first serve, with some folks sleeping in their car for the night getting the best picks.

    Personally, I don't use the reservation system. If you get drawn as Reservation #8 you would likely have been better driving down and getting in line, especially on a week day later in the season, which is when I like to hunt. I prefer to pick my duck hunting days based on the weather, which is tough to do several weeks in advance. You need to be at the office for 5AM either way, so I just get there at 2:30 or 3 and get in line.

    If you're a first-timer, print off the map and head to the marsh in daylight before duck season. Get to know how it looks in daylight so you aren't trying to figure it out in the dark trying to find your blind for the first time. The signs are reflective, which helps, but it can be daunting when you're in a canoe filled with dekes in the dark.

  5. #4
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    Thanks benjhind!

    So the reservation system is for a spot in line, and not a specific blind? That makes much more sense. I was wondering which 8 Zone A blinds were reservable! So if I was lucky enough to get #1 reservation, I'd drive up to the front of the line of cars?

    That clears up a bunch of my questions. Do you happen to know anything about hunting Hahn Marsh or Big Creek? I've heard that these are a bit friendlier to newbies.

  6. #5
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    Hey Manyo, if you did happen to draw #1 reservation or any reservation you only need to go straight to the waterfowl office for 5 am. The staff will call out your res # when it's your turn to pick a blind.
    As for Big Creek, there are 4 or 5 blinds there and also ran through the LPWA. Good luck and hope to see you out there.

  7. #6
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    Don't mistake me for a pro on the area! I only get out hunting there a couple of times a year at best.

    The reservations report to the unit office at 5AM, they don't line up. You'd show up straight to the unit office - the line up of cars is actually past it and there's little sign posts with numbers for each spot in line.

    I don't know anything about Hahn marsh. The Unit has blinds on Big Creek west of the causeway that work the same as any of the other blinds. I've heard people float down Big Creek to jump shoot birds and as far as I know this works the same as any navigable waterway - you are fine unless you step onto land. I've never done it though and I'm not sure what happens when you get into the National Wildlife Area and start coming into people's decoy spreads.

    Thinking about it - I don't think I've seen a map of the Big Creek blinds aside from on the wall in the Unit office. These blinds operate the same as the rest of the "A Zone" blinds. Every year I take a picture of the map and manage to lose it before the next year.

    There is also what they call "B Zone" which is the marsh east of the causeway south of Big Creek. There are no set blind locations here. There is a reduced fee for hunting this location. You just show up to the Unit office and say you want to hunt B Zone, then set up your spread first-come-first-serve. They might limit the total number of hunters in B Zone but from what I've heard it isn't that busy. You'd have to hunt from a boat or a marsh chair.

    If you do hunt the unit you need to bring your birds back to the unit office and check them in after your hunt. You might get a chuckle for bringing in mergansers and you'll likely get a ticket if you bring in a swan.

    It might sound complicated but I assure you that an A-Zone hunt is very user friendly as long as you can find your blind. Get down there this fall and check out the blind locations. Bring your tackle and find a couple largemouth while you're there. Then, after duck season has been open for a couple of weeks and the craziness has died down, pick a "ducky" day (overcast/windy) and get in line early on a weekday. You'll get a decent spot in line, and you can look on the wall to see which blinds have been producing ducks. Then pick your blind and head out.

  8. #7
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    Sounds much simpler than I thought. Thank you all!

    Are the Big Creek blinds walk out or boat access? We're not sure if we want to be messing around with canoes out by Long Point -- I hear that it can be pretty dicey (water levels drop suddenly, stranding you, or winds can produce chop which threatens to capsize canoes). I figure that the walk out blinds in LPWMU itself can be done in a set of chest waders?

  9. #8
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    The big creek blinds aren't walk out blinds. I've hunted the unit many times with a canoe and never had an issue, but I've spent a lot of time canoeing. The Big Creek blinds aren't a far trip and you can launch from the bridge saving you from open water chop if you're nervous.

    If water levels fluctuate, I'd rather have a canoe than waders if it gets deep in a hurry! I've also never chased a cripple in waders... don't imagine that being fun. I've never hunted the walk-outs so I'm not the best source for information.

  10. #9
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    Hello Manyo,

    A few minor corrections to Benjhind's comments:

    1) There is no reduced fee for hunting B Zone.

    2) You will be charged for harvesting a swan regardless of the species ... at least for the next two years anyways ... we could have a Tundra Swan season by 2020 ... see my post regarding this topic.

    A few other comments:

    1) The "walk out" blinds are a good option if you are not familiar with the marsh however the water level is high again this year (highest in 20 years) so some of the "walk out" blinds will probably require a small boat or canoe to get to.

    2) The staff and most of the hunters are very knowledgeable individuals who are willing to help anyone who needs some advice ... so ask if you are not sure.

    Regardless ... have a fun and safe season.

    Jerome

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjhind View Post
    The blinds are assigned on the morning of the hunt. There is a line-up of cars and a reservation system that are used to determine the sequence of who gets to pick their blind first.

    I can't remember exactly how the order goes... but I thought it was
    1st pick = Lineup car #1
    2nd pick = Reservation #1
    3rd pick = Lineup car #2
    4th pick = Reservation #2

    etc. Someone correct me here if I'm wrong.

    I could be wrong on the order but it goes something like that. The "lottery" part is where you enter the draw for a reservation for a given date. The lineup is first come, first serve, with some folks sleeping in their car for the night getting the best picks.

    Personally, I don't use the reservation system. If you get drawn as Reservation #8 you would likely have been better driving down and getting in line, especially on a week day later in the season, which is when I like to hunt. I prefer to pick my duck hunting days based on the weather, which is tough to do several weeks in advance. You need to be at the office for 5AM either way, so I just get there at 2:30 or 3 and get in line.

    If you're a first-timer, print off the map and head to the marsh in daylight before duck season. Get to know how it looks in daylight so you aren't trying to figure it out in the dark trying to find your blind for the first time. The signs are reflective, which helps, but it can be daunting when you're in a canoe filled with dekes in the dark.
    Itís been a while since I used the reservation system but itís a great way to get started hunting the point. It may have changed and I may be wrong but it may be lineup #1, lineup #2, reservation #1, lineup #3, res #2 ...and so on.

    Either way, thatís how I started hunting there about 20 years ago. Go in during the summer, get GPS points. Also start off hunting walk in blinds. Go the night before, hang around the fire and ask questions, most guys are very helpful. Hunt with someone who has experience there. The marsh changes every year so put your time in.

    Nothing beats getting a full strap of mixed ducks in the fall...youíll see.

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